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Disclaimer:  Petinfo4u.com is provided as a free pet care resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian. 

Copyright Petinfo4u.com 1999-2013

 

 

 

 

 

Click on a topic below to see our archived questions: 

Dogs

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Adoption - Blind Puppy

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Aging - Arthritis

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Allergy - Rimadyl Reaction

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Allergy - Allergy Free Breed

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Allergy - Yorkie Gasping For Air

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Allergy - Diets that help with food allergies

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Amputation

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Eating Own Poop

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Aggressive Feeding

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Eats Roots

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Digging

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Ingesting & Vomiting

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Chewing Wood

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Grass Eating 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Separation Anxiety - Chewing

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Separation Anxiety

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Sudden Change in Behavior

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Sudden Aggression

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Scared

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Leash Pulling

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Behavior - Submissive Urination II

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Dachshund 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Inbreeding

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Dachshund Stud

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Heat Cycle and Care

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Heat Cycle - How long

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Yorkie Female

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Care After Parturition (Birth)

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeding - Newborn Bedding

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Cairn Terrier

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Westie Info

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Non- Allergenic

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Allergy Free Breed

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Yorkie Hyper?

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Yorkie Gasping For Air

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Shetland Sheepdog

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Labrador Energy

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Bichon Frise - Potty Training

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Breeds - Bull Terrier Lifespan

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Biting - Play

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Biting - Older Dog

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Dental - Drooling

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Dental - Tooth Broken

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Dental - Toothache

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Feeding - Yorkie Special Diet 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Feeding - How to pick a diet for your dog

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Feeding - Weight Mangement

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Female - Heat Cycle and Care

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Female - Heat Cycle - How long

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Flea & Tick - Remedies

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Flea & Ticks - Ticks

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Grooming - Nail Trimmings

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illness - Anal Glands

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Heart Murmur

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Colitis, Diarrhea, Blood in Stool

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Colitis - Colitis, Blood in Stool

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Colitis, Blood in Stool

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Ear Pain Infection

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Diabetes

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Arthritis

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Seizure or Stroke?

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Bladder Stones/Urinary Infection

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Foxtails

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Puppy Vomiting

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Puppy Vomiting II

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Upset Stomach

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Illnesses - Lyme Disease

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Introductions - Baby/Dog

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Introductions - Dog/Cat Friends?

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Misc. - Car Seat and Seatbelt

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Misc. - Car Restraints

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Misc. - Car Sickness

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Misc. - Pig Ear Stuck

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Misc. - Winter Walks - Snow

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Obedience - Puppy Training 

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Pet Loss Support - Rainbow Bridge

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Poisons - Anti-Freeze Poisoning

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Poisons - Rimadyl Reaction

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - How To

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Inappropriate Elimination

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Pooping Problem

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Crate Training

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Submissive Urination

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Indoor Potty

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Bichon Breed

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Potty Training - Winter

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Puppies - Touching Puppies

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Puppies - Newborn Bedding

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Puppies - Puppy Vomiting

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Senior Dogs - Arthritis

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Senior - Arthritis

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Senior - Aging Symptoms

 

 

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Shedding

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Mange

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Hot Spots

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Rash

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Itching

paw3.gif (983 bytes) Skin - Itchy Golden Retriever

 

 

Your veterinarian should be your first source of care and medical
information.  As with all medical cases, check with your veterinarian before
changing any medical treatments.  This information is meant as a resource,
not as a treatment, diagnosis or replacement of veterinary advice.

 

 

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Nail Trimmings - Nail trimmings are a very important part of grooming and a good place to start with obedience training.  Many types of pets do not like to have their feet handled or touched.  This can make regular nail trimmings a hassle and a fearful time for your pet.  Some pets get so worked up that they scream and bite as if they are being tortured.  Nail trimmings (when done properly) are perfectly harmless and painless.  We never recommend sedating an animal to do a nail trimming.  We always recommend starting as soon as you get your pet with handling the feet and introducing the clipper so that they realize it will not harm them.  If you make nail trimming or any grooming process fun, they will look forward to the "chore".

Start by playing, touching, scratching the feet/paw area several times per day for a couple of weeks or until they become comfortable with having their feet/paws handled.  Be sure to use lots of positive reinforcement and treats! 

Next, introduce the clippers by laying the clippers next to your pet while playing, touching and scratching their feet/paws.  Do this for another week or so.

Finally, pet their feet/paws with the clippers, making sure not to use the clippers.  After a couple days of this, start trimming just the tips of the nail so they get used to the feel.  Be sure to use lots of treats.

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Submissive Urination II -

Submissive urination can be related to a number of issues either medically, physically or emotionally.  First, if your dog is "dribbling" frequently, you should take your puppy to the vet to rule out any medical problems related to bladder infections, incontinence or other kidney related problems.  If your dog "dribbles" only when spoken too, touched or disciplined, chances are it is submissive urination.
 
Submissive urination is a natural instinct for dogs that they are unable to control.  It is a way for your dog to communicate they are letting you be the boss, they are scared or happy, or just saying hello.  Wild dogs do this as a way of greeting the leaders of the pack.  It is not a behavior they can control and should never be corrected with discipline.  Getting mad and using discipline will only make the situation worse and cause them to "dribble" more because they are showing submission to your aggression.

Is your dog spayed or neutered?  Unaltered dogs can develop "dribbling" related to submissive or excited behavior.   

 

Start by not getting your puppy overexcited with "baby talk" or getting him excited when you enter the house.  Basically, ignore him until he calms down.  If you walk in the door, walk right past him, acknowledge him after he calms down.  If he jumps on your lap, do not pet or touch him for about 5 minutes or until he is relaxed.  Do not use a high pitched or excited voice when speaking to him.  Most people don't like to hear this....but if it is not related to a medical problem, 9 times out of 10 it is the owner causing the problem.  If you can change your behavior, most likely your dog's behavior will change.

 
Here are some websites with more info:
 
 
 

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Aging Pets - We have gotten a lot of emails lately about aging pets and decided to list common ailments and problems associated aging.  Any changes in behavior or appetite are often the first signs of illness.  If you notice any of the symptoms below, please take your pet to a vet immediately for a complete check-up.  This is not intended to cover everything, just the most common problems.

Dogs - A dog's lifespan depends greatly on quality of life, size, genetics and breed.  Typical is between 10-12 years.  Dogs are considered senior after age 7 and geriatric after age 10.  This means that you should consider making dietary changes and watch for health problems after age 7.   We also recommend getting a veterinary geriatric check-up at age 7 and again at age 10 (if no obvious problems) to rule out any hidden age related illnesses.  The most common health problems associated with canine aging includes but are not limited to; weight gain, dental problems, arthritis & mobility, eye problems, hair and skin bumps or lumps, diabetes, thyroid problems, kidney and liver problems, heart problems and cognitive dysfunction.   Symptoms to watch for in an older dog:  changes in appetite, lethargy, drinking unusual amounts of water, frequent urination, trouble getting up, cloudy eyes, hair loss, oily skin or roughened skin, sudden weight changes, distended stomach, coughing, bumping into things, and barking at odd hours for no reason.

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Anal Glands - All dogs have anal glands located at the 3:00 and 9:00 position next to the anus.  As gross and stinky as they are, they do serve a valuable service.  Each time a dog goes poop, these glands secret a small amount of fluid used to mark the dog's territory as well as for lubrication.  Unfortunately, these glands often become infected and clogged.  If you notice your dog scooting or licking that area, the glands may be mildly clogged.  Many owners can express these glands as part of regular grooming practice.  These helps eliminate the accidental release on furniture.  The next time you have a regular vet visit, have them show you how to express the glands properly.  However, if you notice that your dog has enlarged or inflammed anal glands, take your dog to the vet immediately for treatment as it is very painful and must be treated with antibiotics.

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Leash Pulling - I know a lot of dog parents don't like to hear this...but, many common dog behavior problems are solved once they discover what it is they are doing to create or encourage the problem.  Keep in mind that one of the best "cures" for behavioral problems is exercise.  Lets face it, the lifestyle for many dogs is boring...playtime and exercise go a long way to relieving boredom.  On that note...we have found a great website that explains a simple solution to leash pulling and the rational to why a dog pulls.

http://www.diamondsintheruff.com/nopulling.html

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How to pick a diet for your dog -

While we can't recommend specific brands for your dogs, we can give you some ideas on what to look for in a quality food.  Allergies are the number one complaint with dog owners.  It is most often associated with a food allergy.  Food allergies are most often caused by food additives and by-products.  Please check with your vet about food allergies and any dietary changes. 
 
People often mix different kinds of protein in food and treats.  Be sure your food and treats have the same protein.  Don't use chicken for one, pig for the other and beef for another.  I like the dried chicken breast strips myself for treats.
 
Check the labels on your current dog food.  The first three ingredients should not contain the words..."by-product", "meal", "corn", "wheat", etc.  The main ingredient should be a protein such as your basic chicken, beef, lamb, or fish.  Then it can contain a starch such as rice, barley, potatoes, etc.  Any other ingredients should be the required vitamins and supplements required by law.  Stick to a food that contains only one protein source and one starch or carb source.  This way it will be easier to rule out any allergies.  You can start with the popular lamb and rice diets (however, make sure there are no other proteins or carbs and definitely no corn, wheat or soy).    For allergies, I prefer a fish and rice or potato diet because the fish has lots of oil and makes the skin and coat look better. 
 
My dog's food label reads:  "Salmon", "Sweet Potatoes", and then lists the vitamin contents.  I can read and understand everything on the label.  It can be found at most large pet stores but definitely not the grocery store!

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Potty Training - Winter - A friend of mine moved into an apartment and had to give her 7 month old rat terrier up. I asked if I could have him and have been very happy with him. He is 8 months old and I am having a very hard time housebreaking him. I live in Minnesota where our winters are very cold. I bought him a sweater and pair of doggie booties but he just seems to hate going out in that weather. We both stand out there and freeze. He is very wonderful with my family and I have fallen in love with this little pup. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Is he to old to be housebroken now? Thank You for any help.

Potty Response - 

Small breed dogs tend to be a little more difficult to completely housetrain...it is not so much that they can't be housetrained, but that we are a little easier on the smaller breeds because the are so cute.  Most dogs are never to old to potty train.  Persistence, Consistency and Patience are the key.  The sweater and the booties are a great start.  (Fortunately, I don't live in Minnesota or my dog may not be housetrained either!  I am not partial to the cold).  If it is too difficult in the snow, try making a potty spot in the garage with newspapers.  Then you can move the potty spot outdoors when the weather is more appropriate.  Unfortunately, it will call for retraining but will be easier. There are also new products for indoor potty areas for dogs. 
 
 
We always recommend during the training period, which lasts about 1 month to 2 months, that you crate your dog whenever you are unable to play and supervise your dog.  This does not mean leave him for hours in the crate unattended.  It just means that he should be in the crate whenever you cannot be right there to take him out for potty time.  Most dogs will refuse to mess their "den".  He should be walked immediately after play, eating and waking (sleeping in the crate also).  Then set a timer about every 30 minutes, take him to the potty spot, use a key word and do not return until he has finished business.  Be sure to give lots of praise when done correctly. 
 
Good luck and wishing you warmer weather.

 

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Lyme Disease - Can you please tell me the symptoms of Lyme disease from a tick bite on
a dog?

Lyme Response - I will forward you onto another website about that one....lyme disease in
dogs is very difficult to determine.  You should consult with your
veterinarian if you think your dog has been exposed.  Below is a link from
the AVMA with more information on lyme disease:

http://www.avma.org


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Bull Terrier - What is the life span of a bull terrier

Bull Terrier Repsonse - 

Lifespans very greatly on the quality of life the dog is living and the breeding quality of the dog.  However, bull terriers have a lifespan of around 10-13 years.  Usually the larger the breed, the shorter the lifespan.  A bull terrier is considered a medium breed.

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Winter Walks - Hi, I have a golden retriever and this is his first winter. I walk him for about and hour on our walks in the summer. Can I walk him in the snow for this long and is there a "cutoff" temperature that would be considered safe for these walks? I love my dog and do not want to cause him any harm by walking him in winter.

Winter Response - 

The biggest danger of walking your dog in the winter time is the ice melting chemicals on the roads and sidewalks as well as the salt used to melt the ice.  These things can cause burns to the pads of your dog's feet.  If you think your dog has come into contact with these, be sure to wash his feet immediately after walking.  You can purchase dog booties at most pet stores that will protect their feet from chemicals and cold.  Below is a website with a brand called muttluks found in pet stores.
 
 
Most longer haired dog breeds are well equipped to handle some temperature extremes for a short period of time.  In general, it usually considered that if you are comfortable, your dog is comfortable in any temperature setting.  If you are uncomfortable or cold, your dog probably is too.  We would recommend that you start of slow and see how your dog reacts to the cold.  Some dogs will refuse to go outside and some love it.  Definetly use something to protect his feet such as booties or coating.  I personally have had my lab up in the snow on walks about 20 minutes at about 20 degrees.  Much colder than that and I would definetly be uncomfortable.

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Bichon - I am interested in a Bichon Frise and a friend of mine has informed me that they are not easily house broken and even at two years old they are not trained.  She said that this is a problem with the breed.  Is this true?

Bichon Response - 

Bichon Frises are not necessarily more difficult to house train than other breeds...however, as a general rule most smaller breeds are considered more difficult because they are more pampered by their owners.  I have friends that own Bichons and not one has a problem with house training.  If you are consistent with training, provide basic obedience training, and do not over pamper your dogs, they will be easily house trained.
 
By the way, Bichons are an excellent breed choice! 

 

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Sudden Aggression - I have a cocker poodle mix that I rescued when she was a year and a
half.  I have now had her 3 years.  She is very sweet to me and we have
never she has never been aggressive toward me.  She does have a touch of
separation anxiety and will whine when I leave her.  I began doing
flyball with her a year ago and noticed that she fear bites strangers.
She is so cute that when people come up to pet her she will let them and
then without warning bite.  After the first incident I became more
protective with her and would not allow people to put their hands near
her mouth.  The most recent incident occured with a family member.  She
jumped in their lap allowing them to pet her, then turned and bit their
finger.  There was no warning or anything.  It is difficult for me to
correct the behavior because it is not a regular occurrence, it has
happened 2 times in the past year, but I do not want to continue to
worry about her interacting with strangers.  What can I do to solve this
problem?

Aggression Response - Aggression can be a confusing problem....there are always underlying
triggers that are not always easy to understand.  The first thing to rule
out is pain.  Pain is the number one trigger of sudden aggression.  It is
often the first sign of illness.  Is it possible that your cockapoo has an
old injury (prior to adoption) such as an old break or fracture that at
certain times of the year (winter) or when handled a certain way causes
pain?  Could she have developed a back problem from the flyball?  Could she
have a tumor causing pain?  While it may not be the problem, it is worth a
check-up with your vet to rule it out.  There are certain horomonal problems
that can cause a dog with fluctuating horomones to become aggressive also.

Since you mention she has developed or has separation anxiety (which is very
common in rescued dogs), she could also have some fear aggression in
conjunction with the separation anxiety.  However, I do not think this
necessarily applies because it sounds as if she is not biting out of fear,
but maybe protectiveness towards you, territorial, excitement, etc.  There
is also the chance that the flyball activity over stimulates her and causes
stress.  Is this behavior most notable during or after flyball training and
competitions?  Some dogs do not respond well to stressful situations.  It
would be similar to you being very stressed and taking it out by yelling
(her with biting).

If she has only bit on several occassions some of the links below may seem
extreme, however it is true the aggression can get worse and should be
treated immediately.  Please talk to your vet and an animal behaviorist to
start getting to the root of the problem.

Have you considered a muzzle for her until you resolve the problem?  Please
consider this so that someone unfamiliar with your dog does not ask to have
her destroyed if biten.

Here are some links with some more information:

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/aggres1.html


Please let us know how she is doing.

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Puppy Vomiting II - I have a 6 month old yorky. He has been vomiting for two day's. He
does'nt want to move,walk or eat . He can't seem to keep anything in his
tummy. I don't know if it's because I've changed his food? I was giving
him dry puppy chow for five month's but now have changed it to
(dry)Pedigree for puppy's.It's has only been 4 weeks that he's try'd
Pedigree. I don't know if that is the reason. What should I do... Please
help.

Puppy Response - We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary care, advice or
treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource.  Your first resource
should always be your veterinarian.

Please take your yorkie to the vet!  If he has been vomiting for two days,
is not eating, walking or moving....it sounds serious.  There are a number
of things it could be...has he been vaccinated for Parvo?  Parvo is a
life-threatening virus that causes extreme vomiting and bloody diarrhea.  It
has to be treated by a vet.  Another idea that comes to mind is that your
yorkie may have something blocking his intestines or throat.  Did he
recently play with a toy, string, paper, etc. that could be blocking his
intestines or throat?  This also life-threatening and needs to be treated by
a vet.

A food change should not cause such a problem.  Food changes usually only
cause mild diarrhea for a couple of days and is seen immediately after
changing the food.

Again, please take your yorkie to the vet.

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Separation Anxiety - I have a 13 month old female Jack Russell that appears to suffer from seperation anxiety that has excaserbated since she had a litter of pups she managed the litter with excellence as she was only 10 months when she whelped.  All 4 pups are alive and well. I have sold 2 of the 4 and the other 2 are leaving in the next couple of days I have read that a companion is good we also have a male JR that is 2.  That doesn't seem to help at all she is very aggressive toward him as though she misses him too.  I crate both dogs when I leave home and at night, she gets so upset that she picks the cage up with her teeth while inside and can travel almost all the way throught the house.  I would rather not sedate her if possible if you could offer any form of advice I would greatly appreciate it, I leave the radio on in my abscence to try and pacify her as much as possible.

Separation Response - 

It sounds like you have done a little research on separation anxiety and have tried all the "normal" cures.  Some dogs can develop this into an obsession.  This simply means that it is a way for your dog to soothe itself.  You need to discover a new way for your dog to soothe itself when anxious.  This can be very difficult.  Most dogs are soothed by the confines of a crate.  However, it sounds as if your dog is not.  Below is a link to a story I found with similarities.  However, they did finally medicate their dog.  I do not necessarily recommend this unless it is diagnosed that your dog has a "disorder".  Most dogs that are medicated can be slowly reduced on their medication and may even be able to discontinue the medication after they have developed good behaviors.  You don't say whether or not your JRT gets lots of exercise.  Since JRT's are very active, I would recommend you vigorously exercise your dog for at least 1/2 hour prior to leaving and upon returning.  A tired dog is usually a sleepy dog.  Do not forget the golden rule of separation anxiety which is to ignore your dog 15 minutes prior to leaving and 15 minutes upon returning.  Also, do not jingle keys which signals your departure.  Have you tried the kong toys filled with peanut butter that can take hours to finish?   This may work temporarily.  I would also recommend that you try doing some retraining in the crate when you are not working.  Put her in her crate and stay near her giving her treats when she is acting appropriately.  Constantly reassuring her....this can take up to a month of retraining.  Keep her in her crate (never alone) constantly reassuring her and letting her out for exercise food and play.  She should learn to be comfortable in her crate not anxious.  You might also consider trying a different type of crate.  She may feel more comfortable in an enclosed or covered crate.  Because her puppies are being weaned this may be an especially anxious time for her.  She may improve after the puppies have been gone for a while.  Another avenue to explore is obedience training.  Even if your dog is well trained, obedience training helps to build confidence and may reduce her reliance on you.
 
 
Please let us know how she is doing. 

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Itchy Golden

I have a two year golden retriever female who seems to itch & chew alot.  I find dry, flaky, dark scabby spots occasionally on her legs (front & back) and also "rashy" looking spots in her armpit area and under side.  She chews on herself alot especially her paws and legs. She has no fur loss at these spots now - they are sometimes hard to spot due to her thick fur.  I just found that one of her nipples is very red and sore looking like she has really been scratching it.  Do you have any idea what might be causing this and what I can do treat these spots and prevent them.
 

Itchy Reponse - We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary care, advice or
treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource.  Your first resource
should always be your veterinarian.

What you are describing sounds like allergies or hot spots.  The number one allergy in dogs is usually food or fleas...however, most fleas have disappeared by now because of winter.  They can still be around in the warm parts of the country.  Even if your dogs do not have fleas, some dogs with allergies respond well when put on flea medication such as Program or Advantage.  The other most common allergy is a food allergy.  Have you tried a non-allergenic diet such as lamb & rice (most commercial brands have this mix)?  I have a lab that is allergic to dog food that contains wheat...try and stay away from brands that have a main ingredient of wheat and corn.  Rice and barley are less allergenic.  You can also try coating their food with a tablespoon of olive oil at least twice per week to help with dry skin. 

 
Hot spots are brought on by excessive itching and are actually infected areas that become so itchy that it can become an obsession.  Hot spots generally need to be treated with antibiotics because they are the result of a secondary skin infection from all the scratching and licking.  You could try using an anti-bacterial ointment on the rash (it may help if it is bacterial).  Also try using an oatmeal shampoo for bathing.
 
Below is a link on our site (in case you missed it) with more information and great links on allergies.
 
 

 

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Upset Stomach - My little miniature poodle got into some ham lunchmeat last night and now is really paying the price.  She was up vomiting several time during the night and still acts like she doesn't feel very well.  Is there something I can give to her to help settle her tummy? 

Stomach Response - 

We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.
 
I hope your dog is feeling better.  Below is a link with great ideas for home remedies.   For you information...it is ok to give your dog antacids (see link for dosages).  Because of what your dog ate, she may be experiencing gas pain and bloating.  If you notice that she does not improve, please take your dog to the vet.  Some dogs can develop a life-threatening problem called bloat.  Bloat is usually seen in larger dogs but can happen to any dog experiencing severe gas.  It is dangerous because the stomach becomes twisted and if not treated is lethal. 
 
 
 
Let us know how she is doing. 

Upset Stomach Update:  

I did end up taking my dog to the vet but she ended up dying anyway.  We still don't know what caused her to become sick but it is suspected that she threw a clot and had a stroke.  This was a terrible blow to our family as she was a beloved part of our family.  Thank you for you advice anyway.

Update Response - 

I am so sorry to hear that you lost her.  I have listed a link below that is a great help during times of sorrow.
 
 
 
Thank you for the update,

 

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Puppies Vomiting - In brief, found 4 female puppies (guess 8-12 weeks old) on side of road last week. Appeared to be healthy. Been feeding dry dog food. This morning, 2 of the 4 very sick - extremely lethargic, occasional vomiting (mostly dry heaves), will drink some water and are able to uriniate (if I hold them up to stand). Only poisons on the property are out of their reach. Can't afford to take to local vet, bad economy here in Alabama hit us hard. Just trying to keep them alive until we find good homes. Thank you for any insight!

Puppies Response - 

We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian. Our information is provided as a resouce.
 
Seperate the healthy puppies immediately!!!!
 
Do the puppies have diarrhea or blood in their stool?  Do they have a sickly sweet smell to themselves or their stool?  I hope it is not the case, however, puppies that young could be susceptible to parvo and it is generally fatal if not treated immediately by a vet.  Parvo will get worse very quickly with continually vomiting and very bad diarrhea.  Dehydration is the biggest danger.  There are no home treatments because the dogs die quickly from dehydration.  Intravenous fluids and medication are the only treatment option.  Parvo is found in the soil and other dog feces and is very contagious.    Check out the link below for more information.
 
  The only thing I can recommend because you cannot afford a vet is to take them to your local shelter...be sure to call ahead and let them know about the parvo!  The shelter may care for them and then find them homes. 

Puppy Update: Thank you for your reply. Out of all the places I emailed, you were THE most helpful. Through the night, one of the puppies died. This morning, the other one appears to be much better. The link you sent about parvo seemed to match their symptoms. It is still early morning here, but I think I will go ahead and take them all to the animal shelter. My husband and I like to try to find homes for strays (our local shelter euthanizes sometimes the same day you bring them in), but we are now worried that our other animals might have been infected (indoor/outsoor cat and a mostly indoor dog). I have been running around the house like an idiot with a can of disinfectant!

Update Response - 

Thank you for having such a kind and big heart to help animals in need!  We need more people like you and your family.
 
I am sorry to hear that one of the puppies died.  I hope that your indoor dog is vaccinated against parvo.  If not, please get him vaccinated.  Cats do not get parvo.  It is very contagious and lives in the ground and may be dormant during the winter only to return in the summer.  It can get on your clothes, shoes thereby traveling around your yard and house.  Bleach is the only disenfectant for parvo.   If your other dog shows any symptoms, lethargy, vomiting and loss of appetite are usually first, get him to the vet immediately.  It can be treated in some cases.

More Updates:  Just wanted to let you know that I spoke with a local veterinarian - was going to take our "indoor" dog in for parvo tests and vaccine, even if I had to beg him for a discount or payment plan. He assured me that she is immune because of her old age (12). He said that in all his years as a vet, never a case of parvo in dogs over 3 years of age. I will still do whatever I can to disinfect our yard in case a stray dog wanders through (which happens a lot out here in our rural dwellings), but at least I can cease my anxiety about our little Bischon. Just wanted to share the good news with you, and thank you again for going through this crisis with me!

Update Response :  

Am so glad you got your vets advice!  It is true that puppies are more likely to contract and die from the virus, however, your dog may still get it but not such a serious case.  Please keep an eye for about 7-10 days to see if he develops any symtoms.  7-10 days is the infection period.  If he starts to show symptoms, please call your vet immediately for advice. 
 
Please read the following link for more information, it has great information on parvo and the spread of the virus.  You are right...you cannot use bleach on a carpet.  I would have your carpet at least cleaned by a carpet cleaner.  There is a solution called nolvasan that is used by vet offices (ask them about it).  It is blue in color and don't think it will hurt the carpet (not sure though). 
 
 
 
Thank you so much for the updates.  Keep up your good work...just be sure when bringing home strays that you "quarantine" them for several days to be sure they don't develop illnesses and infect your family pets.

 

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Newborn Bedding

we are expecting a litter of golden retriever puppies what kind of bedding do we need?

Newborn Response - 

Congratulations!  There are several options to consider.  You can prepare a whelping box, large cardboard box or kiddie plastic pool or just prepare a familiar area that your female has picked.  Provide either newspaper or easily cleaned sheets and towels for the birthing process.  The mother will clean up best she can after birth and then will clean the puppies eliminations for a couple of weeks.  However, you will need to provide clean bedding material as needed, usually every other day.  It is very important that the puppies be kept warm.  We recommend using a heating pad on its lowest setting under the bedding material.  Below are links with information on newborn puppy care:
 
 
http://www.petplace.com/Articles/artShow.asp?artID=4182 (instructions on making whelping box
 
 
 
http://www.labbies.com/whelp.htm (a good breakdown of what happens)
 
Golden retrievers can have large litters of 6-10 puppies.  Good Luck!  Send us some pictures for our pet pictures page.

 

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Foxtails - Hi can you tell me how harmful it is to hunt my dog in heavy foxtail fields here in Minnesota. I have heard it can kill hunting dogs here as well as out west. Please send any info you have we are thinking of have a dog trial in a heavy foxtail field but don't want to put the dogs in harm.

Foxtail Response - 

That is a dilemma...foxtails are not generally lethal but are dangerous because they can burrow and travel throughout the body if left unchecked.  The most common problems associated with foxtails are ears, nose, toes and coat.  Foxtails are V shaped and have barbs which enable them to penetrate and burrow into skin.  Complications occur when they are allowed to burrow into the skin, between the toes, into ear canals, and from the nose into the lungs.  Generally complications can be kept to a mininmum by combing the coat after contact, checking ears, nose, throat and between toes.  If a foxtail has been allowed to burrow into the skin...do not try to remove it, the barbs on the foxtail make it very difficult as well as extremely painful.  Only a vet should remove foxtails and treat with antibiotics.
 
However, there is a big difference between a dog on a leash taking a stroll through long grass and a dog doing field trials.  We would not recommend doing the field trials where there are foxtails.  If you do decide to hold the trials, each participant should be given a foxtail alert, symptoms and treatment sheet.  Check out the links below.
 
 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.

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Scared of Riding in Car -

2006 Scared Behavior

Our Puppy, Huckabee, a 14 wk standard Schnoodle.  She has an avid fear of our entryway.  We have an "L" shape stairway.  Doorway, Long Staircase, Landing, then 2 steps to Right.
 
Huckabee will balk at the doorway 90 percent of the time.  If she does enter she backs out again, repeating this process while crying. 
 
If I put her on the first step she will climb the first stairway wait for me on the Landing than grudgingly take the last two steps.
 
The reverse is the most problematic as we attempt to potty train.  She will whine to go out and go within 5 feet of the stairwell, balk.  I have tried to encourage her, coax her but she will have none of it.  She gets so nervous she ends up peeing on the carpet  I have even tried to place her favorite treat at the edge of the steps.  She will go grab the snack and back up to her safety zone. 
 
We placed bells at next to the staircase to train her to ask to go out.  We have her tap the bells as we carry her out.  Could this be the problem?

Response -

I am trying to picture your entryway from your description but having a hard time.  The only thing I can think of is she must have had a bad experience of some kind at the entryway.  This could be something as simple as a reprimand received at this exact place, a loud noise that sacred her, or even static electricity between her and a carpet.  Does your entryway have tile or any slippery material?  My lab is a little uneasy on our laminate floor because it is slippery and is easily scared by any noises it makes.  If you think it is related to the flooring, simply try adding rugs or other covering to alleviate her fear.  This also might help if something else is scaring her...simply changing the look might help.  As for a sound...the bells could be triggering it...if this is the case, could it be that she is actually anticipating the bells and it is making her anxious or excited?  Try removing the bells and replacing them with something else so she can see that they are gone.  If she associates a bad memory with this area, the only way to fix that is to change her opinion.  You did right by trying the treat method.  However, since that did not work you might try more involved methods such as crating her in the entryway but only when you are there with her encouraging her, feeding her there, and playing with her.  Never leave her there alone which might instill more fear.  Then gradually working to the same methods but without the crate.  The point is to instill happy thoughts at the door.  Try always asking her to come to you past the entryway and always have a treat ready for her so that she knows going past the entry is a good thing.  Hopefully it's just a puppy phase and she will grow out of it with your encouragement.
 
Thank you for your participation in our website,
petinfo4u.com

2003 Scared of Car - I have an 18 month old female Bassett that gets extremely nervous, antsy and whiney while riding in the van. It doesn’t matter how long the trip is. I got her at 11 months from the Humane Society and have never taken her on any trip that would be considered traumatic.

I am taking her on a six hour (each way) trip to my parents for Thanksgiving and was wondering if there is something that I could give her to help calm her down. I would prefer something that is natural or as close as possible.

Car Response - 

One of the reasons some dogs are anxious in the car is because they are highly excited.  Car rides are fun for most dogs.  However, too much excitement can make them nervous and even sick.  Before going on your six hour trip, try taking her on lots of short rides around the neighborhood.  Reward her in the car when she is not whining or acting anxious.  When on your long trip, keep food to a minimum in case she gets sick.  Treats are ok.  Below are some websites with some information on natural alternative sedatives:
 
 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and does not replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.

 

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Toothache - What can I do to help my dogs toothache until my vet opens tommorrow/ Thanks

Toothache Response - 

Your dog can receive coated aspirin to help with the pain.  However, you will need to call an emergency vet to find the correct dosage.  Below is a link with a dosage chart.  Feed your dog canned food or milk soaked kibble. 
 
 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.
 

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Amputation - I adopted my dog from the humane society. He was rescued after he had to have hip surgery following being hit by a car/truck. I was told that they cut off the head of his femur. I was told he did not have any neurovascular damage to his extremity. He has constantly chewed on his foot; resulting in an amputation of his toe at the joint. We have worked hard at keeping him from chewing and had it healed until yesterday. He has started to chew on the remaining "good" toe. I caught him today trying to chew off his toe. Help! What is going on? I'm  taking him to the vet tomorrow.

Amputation Response - 

Thank you for having a place in your heart for a special needs dog!  What a wonderful person you are.
 
We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.
 
There are several things that come to mind.  They are; the obvious one being a neurological problem associated with the surgery, an obsessive disorder which can develop from a dog trying to soothe itself and finds that chewing itself to peices is better than itching or having constant pain, and skin infection causing severe itching (hot spots).  Even if either one of these was actually the cause, your vet should have given you an elizabethan collar to prevent your dog from chewing on itself.  These collars are great for stopping obsessive licking and chewing which can cause secondary skin infections that are so itchy that most dogs will chew themselves into a bloody mess.  The idea with the collar is to keep the dog from the activity and to distract him with other ways of soothing himself.  Eventually either the habit will stop or the problem will have been treated and will stop.  If skin infections and obesessive behavior have been ruled out, I would recommend you get a second opinion on whether or not your dog has nerve damage from the surgery.  You don't say how long ago he had this surgery.  It is possible that the nerves are still "healing" and causing some unusual sensations for your dog.
 
 
 
Please let us know what you discover and how your dog is doing.

Amputation Update:

Noah is scheduled to have his leg removed in the morning. He is such a loving & brave little dog. My family & I decided that if Noah could live with three legs & be happy, we could be happy having him as our friend. I hope we are doing the right thing for him. I just don't want him to suffer. My husband & I are both nurses and we know people sometimes go through an awful lot & still have awful outcomes. God sent Noah to us and we intend to take care of him just like he was one of our kids. Thank you for your response. Pray that the little guy does ok. Thank you for your information

Update Response :

Noah will do just fine...he has a family that loves him.  Check out these heart warming stories:
 
http://www.petswithdisabilities.org/stories.html

Another Update:

Can you send me any information on what is best to rehabilitate my poor Noah. I know the vet will give us instructions after the amputation of his leg. But I like to read things for my self too. Thank you for being so helpful.

Update Response :

Glad to help...
 
 
 
Let me know if they are helpful and how Noah is doing.

Heartwarming Update:

Just an update on Noah. He is doing great. He is getting back to his active state. It is so-o-o-o good to see him run on his three legs. He has been chasing his ball around the back yard. Thanks for all of you support.

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Diabetes - We have a wonderful little min pin named Cleo.  She has had diabetes for
about two years.  She has been seeing a specialist.  Over the past two
years Cleo has been on several types of insulin and dosages.
Recently it was discovered that she has a "thickening around her
intestinal wall".  Her vet prescribed prednisone to be taken orally, but this did not
seem to help.  She has lost a great deakl of weight.  Cleo is now getting
the prednisone through and injection.  Do you have any information or experience with a case like this???  We would appreciate any help you might give.

Diabetes Response - We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource.  Your first resource
should always be your veterinarian.

Unfortunately with diabetes there can be secondary conditions develop
complicating the condition further.  From your description, a thickening
around the intestinal wall usually means colitis or inflamatory bowel
disease.  Basically it means there is irritation to the intestinal lining.
There can be many causes for either of these conditions and it is usually
difficult to diagnose what is causing the inflammation.  It may just be a
complication of the diabetes.  Prednisone is a common treatment for any type
of inflammation.  Prednisone is a steriod which reduces inflammation.
However, I have read that prednisone is not an ideal treatment for a dog
with diabetes because it makes it more difficult to regulate the insulin
levels.  On a good note, prednisone should increase Cleo's appetite.  Diet
also plays an important role in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease,
colitis and diabetes.  Your vet should be able to provide you with a diet
that is beneficial to both the diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease.
These diets are usually high in fiber and a non-allergenic diet.   Below are
links with information on diabetes, IBD and colitis:


http://www.petdiabetes.org/education_index.htm (great website with lots of
diabetes information)

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1571&articleid=305

http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/colitis.html

On another note, I am not sure if it would be related, but I did find a lot
of association with the information I was looking up and pancreatitis and
cushings disease.  I hope that this information is helpful.  Please let us
know how Cleo is doing. 

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Heat Cycle - I have a Lab that is 10.5 months old and in heat, can you tell me how long that will last? She is currently tied up, as there are other dogs in the area that it is driving them crazy. I hate to keep her tied, her and my other 2 have the run of 2.5 acres.
  Also, I heard that before you spay them they should have a litter, so they won't get prematurely fat. (fact or wise tale)?

Heat Cycle Response - 

Signs of heat usually last up to 2 weeks.  However, dogs are generally in heat before you notice the signs.  It is a wives tale "to let your dog have a litter before spaying her"...it is common practice now is to spay females as early as three months old. 
 

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Car Seat Restraints - Is there some kind of safety device I can purchase for my dog.  I worry about his safety.  

Car Seat Response - There are several devices available for restraining your dog in the car. Below are links to those websites with information on doggie seat belts:
 
 
 
 
 

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Shetland Sheepdog - Do you have any information on this breed of dog

Shetland Response

The Shetland Sheepdog is commonly referred to as a Sheltie.  The Sheltie belongs to the herding group of dogs.  This means that generally these types of dogs have high energy, may try to herd family members (nip at small children), and are very intelligent.  Shelties are small dogs at about 20 - 25 pounds.  Their size is ideal for an apartment or condo, however, because of their energy level they should have a yard.  Good socialization training is recommended for this breed because of their guarding nature.  They are known for protecting their "flock".  
 
Here are some links with more information:
 
 
 

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Indoor Potty

I have a miniature schnauzer that is potty trained (to go outside).  I recently moved and cannot come home for lunch to let her out.  Several years ago, I saw on an animal channel where you could grow indoor grass for your pet to alleviate itself on.  Cassie hates to potty in the house...so she holds it forever.  That could not be pleasant for her.  I think she would use the indoor grass and be much happier.  Do you have any suggestions along this line?

Indoor Potty Response - 

What a great idea!  Our suggestions include the patio park and litter training (very popular now).  Below are links to information on these nifty ideas:
 
 
Our section on dog litter in case you didn't see it is below:
 
Dog Litter - Have you heard of or tried the new dog litter?!  We think this may be one of the best ideas in pet products.  Dog litter will benefit those that have a new puppy being potty trained, those that live in cold climates, and those that live in apartments and cities.  For puppies, litter training combined with crate training, scheduled feedings, scheduled playtime and using a cue word to signal potty time means SUCCESS!  For those living in cold climates, litter training means no more trips out in the cold snow or your pet refusing to go out.  For those living in apartments and cities where potty places are limited, it means freedom from "potty bags".  As the old saying goes, even old dogs can learn new tricks.  It is not just for the puppies, all dogs can be retrained to use the litter.   Dog litter is designed with puppies and smaller dogs in mind and is not recommended for large dogs (we think you could try).   Check your local pet store for this new product.  

The new litter comes with a potty training guide, litter pan, gloves, odor remover, and scooper.   The only drawback we can see is getting over the initial "ick" factor of having your dog poop in the house.  Obviously, the litter pans need to be cleaned out frequently. 

Below are links to more information on Dog Litter:

http://www.doglitter.com/prod_info.htm

http://www.epinions.com/pets-Dogs-Training-All-Purina_secondnature_Dog_Litter

You could fashion your own indoor potty area with sod and a low sided plastic liner or small kid's pool.  The key is to find something totally washable.  

 

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Separation Anxiety Chewing

WE OWN A BLACK LAB/AUSSIE SHEPPARD /CHOW MIX THAT WE ADOPTED FROM THE SPCA IN FLORIDA.  IN MAY OF THIS YEAR WE MOVED FROM FLORIDA TO NORTH CAROLINA AND INTO AN APARTMENT FOR 3 MONTHS
AND THEN INTO OUR NEW HOUSE.  THE PROBLEM IS NOW WHEN MY WIFE AND I LEAVE FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME HE BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE
IF WE BLOCK HIM IN THE KITCHEN AREA HE GETS OUT AND THEM CHEW ON A CORNER OF A CHAIR, SOFA  AND WHEN WE GET HOME HE KNOWS HE IS BAD BY THE WAY HE IS ACTING.  SO THEN WE STARTED PUTTING HIM IN A CAGE FOR LARGE DOGS WHEN WE LEAVE FOR THE DAY OR ANY LENGTH OF TIME, BUT KNOW HE IS CHEWING UP THE TOWEL THAT IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CAGE.

Separation Anxiety Response - 

Have you ever heard of seperation anxiety?  That sounds like what you are describing.  Seperation anxiety is caused by stress in a pet's environment.  Moving is definetly a stress to most pets.  Crate training is great a way to combat this behavior problem.  Crate training helps to create a safe-haven and relieve anxiety.  Below are some links from our website and others with information on seperation anxiety and crate training.
 
 
Copied info from our website:

Chewing Problem - A dog that chews continuously and for prolonged periods of time has a behavioral problem that can be corrected with time and patience.  Generally, chewing problems start from loneliness and can become an obsessive condition.  When chewing develops into an obsession, the chewing is harder to stop because it has become a way for the dog to soothe itself.  Dogs that are prone to obsessive chewing are also experiencing separation anxiety.   

The first step towards stopping chewing is to understand separation anxiety.  Obviously, our dogs would like to be around us all day, therefore, when we are gone for prolonged periods of time, they get lonely and can develop bad behaviors.   To combat separation anxiety do not make a big deal about leaving or arriving home.  This means no excited hellos or goodbyes.   Prolonged goodbyes only signal the dog that you are leaving and heightens their anxiety.    Below is a link with more information about separation anxiety associated with chewing.

The next step is to break the cycle of obsessive chewing and soothing.  Get a soda can, fill it with some rocks or pennies.  Plan a training session by letting your dog know you are leaving.    Sneak back into the house and stay hidden.  When your dog starts the chewing, shake the can vigorously to distract him.  Distract him every time he chews, until you are ready to "return" (return when not chewing).  When you are home, use the terms "no chew" when training.   Give this command when leaving the house.   Leave for short periods at first, slowly extending the time away.   Try leaving a radio on or tape with soothing sounds of your voice.

The third step is to keep your dog occupied when you are gone for long periods of time.  Give them something to do when you leave such as a special toy and special treats that are only given when you leave.  Treats should be something that occupies their time.  Try a game such as hide-n-seek with toys and treats or have a surprise visit scheduled from a neighbor or friend (a walk) to break-up the day.   Exercise is also a great way to keep your dog from barking.  A tired dog is a sleepy dog.  Go for an extended walk or run prior to leaving the house.  

http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/separtn.htm

http://www.inch.com/~dogs/separationanxiety.html

Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.

 

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Rimadyl Reaction

My Cairn Terrier had a bad reaction to Rimadyl about a month ago. Her liver functions have returned to normal but her kidneys are still impaired. She is being treated with daily IV's.  Can you direct me to a source that might be able to suggest a homeopathic remedy that would support renal function and speed up regeneration?

Rimadyl Response - 

I am happy to hear that your dog is on the way to recovery!  Below are some links that I found regarding dogs and reactions to Rimadyl.  I have also included links to some holistic sites.  Kidneys play an important role in the body by filtering out the toxins in the blood.  As the kidney is damaged it looses the ability to filter these toxins which can slowly build-up and poison the body.  The kidneys remove these toxins in the dog's urine.  Therefore, it is very important that your dog has access to lots of water and is hydrated to flush the system.  Diet also plays an important role in the health of kidneys.  I have heard differing opinions about whether the diet should be high in protein or low in protein (recipe link below).  It is said that diets low in protein are better because they reduce the toxin build-up in the blood stream.  Ask your vet about prescription kidney diets available.  Vitamin supplements are also important because they replace those lost in increased urine flow.  Below are holistic supplements that may support kidney function (always check with your vet before changing or adding new treatments):
 
Body Tissues & Organs - Vitamin C, Magnesium, Sodium, Beta Carotene, Feverfew, Yucca, Grapeseed
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/2167/  (dietary management & recipes)
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.  We are not affiliated with any of the above sites and do not imply anything about their products or information.
 

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Car Seats and Seatbelts - I am looking for a doggie car seat. If you have any idea where one can be purchased please email me

Car Seats and Seatbelts Response - 

You don't say what size your dog is...the car seats seem to be for smaller sized dogs.  I have copied below some links with information on car seats and harnesses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
We are not affiliated with any of these companies and make no representation or opinions about their company or products.
 

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Puppy Tooth Broke - My 3 1/2 month old puppy broke one of her incisors in
half.  Is this a puppy tooth?  What are my options if it is not?

Puppy Tooth Broke Response - It is not uncommon for teeth to break in a puppy.  However, it is important to see your vet to be sure that it is not a permanent tooth and that there
are no subsequent problems such as; pain and infection.  Puppies loose their
baby teeth at different rates just as in people.  The "norm" is around 4
months of age, which you are very close at 3 1/2 months.  If it is a baby
tooth, more than likely, your vet will recommend to have it removed to
prevent disease and problems with the adult tooth.  Does the damage extend
down into the pulp cavity?  If so, there may be pain and infection
associated with the break.  A root canal can be performed to protect it.  If
it does not seem to affect the puppy and it is a permanent tooth, you can
have it capped or filled to prevent future problems.  Below are links to
more information:

http://www.woofsandmeows.com/Canineteeth.htm

http://www.tooth-vet.com/services.html#Juvenile

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Itching -

We have a Rat Terrier,she has a problem with her skin itching..We have taken her to the vet. once this summer and he gave her a shot which I believe was some type os steriod. Seemed to help  for a while but after a time she started scratching again. This isn't a flea or tick problem. She stays in the house when we are gone and we let her outside when we are out with her. She bites and scratches until she makes her hair come off, and there are areas that get real red..like a rash......Could you tell us of something that would help with this problem. Kay Cozart

Itching Response - 

Skin problems are one of the most common complaints of dog owners.  Usually a vet will give steroid shots which are great at relieving the itching but do nothing to cure the problem.  Skin problems are mostly associated with some type of allergy whether it be an inhalant, airborne, or fleas.  There are expensive skin tests that can be done to tell you what the allergy is or you can do a process of elimination to determine what the allergy is.  The first place to start is food.  Food allergies are the most common.  Foods that are non-allergenic include; lamb & rice, chicken and rice, eggs, pasta, and be sure the commercial dog food you feed  does not contain wheat products.  The next most common allergy is fleas.  You said that you don't have fleas...however, for some reason even dogs that do not have fleas have shown vast improvement on their itching when treated with Advantage or Program (flea treatments).   Do you use any type of air freshner or rug deoderizer on your carpet?  These products can also contribute to an allergic pet problem.  Another important underlying problem associated with the excessive itching and licking is a bacterial infection which can make the itching even more intense.  This type of infection can only be treated with antibiotics.  Symptoms of bacterial infections are red irritated skin, lesions, and continuous licking.  Because you said that the her itching has returned and that her hair falls out and the skin is red, please check with your vet to make sure that she has not developed a bacterial infection. 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian. 
 
Below I have copied links with more information about skin problems:
 
 
 
 

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Bladder Stones/Urinary Infection -

2006

I am glad you have taken your dog to the vet. Your first resource should always be your vet.  We are not vets and cannot give veterinary advice.
 
Clavamox is an antibiotic used to treat bladder infections...I am assuming your vet is treating a bladder or urinary tract infection.  Usually the symptoms for a bladder infection include; frequent urination or straining, lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, etc. Clavamox does not help her to urinate but is used to treat any infections causing urination problems.  As for helping her urinate, you are doing the right thing by treating her...she may be not urinating when she needs to because it is painful, just like when we have bladder infections.  When she was asleep, it is possible that she held it for so long that when her muscles relaxed, it just leaked out.  The antibiotic should kick in quickly and you should see improvement within a couple of days.  If not, you should return to your vet immediately for consideration of other problems such as bladder stones or kidney problems. 
 
 
 
 
 
Thank you for your participation in our website,
petinfo4u.com

2002 - I have a 3year old min.schnauzer and last week he started to act odd. he started to go under the bed  and he has started to chew on his right paw. He also has started to swing his head around like something is biting him on
his rear haunch.  We checked and can find nothing.  He has no fleas or sores
on his body.  He also gets a sticky substance on the hair around his penis
that I have to clean off. He is not playin g or acting like he usually does.
Can you please help me? (there are no other pets and just my husband and
myself)

Bladder Stones/Urinary Infection Response - We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or
treatment.  Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to
replace veterinary care advice or treatment.  Your first resource should
always be your veterinarian.

Any changes in behavior, appetite or energy level can be the first
indication of illness.  We are very concerned about the behaviors and
symptoms you are describing.  Please take your dog to the vet immediately.
From your description there are several things that come to mind:

Hiding usually means that an animal is experiencing pain.  This may also
further be confirmed by the fact that you say he is trying to bite at his
sides.  Animals will try and look at or chew at a spot that hurts.   From
your description of his symptoms, it could mean bladder infection, kidney
stones, etc.  From your description of the sticky stuff, this is not normal
and may indicate a kidney or bladder infection also (are their crystals in
his urine?).   Symptoms of these types of infections include; pain while
urinating, frequent urination with little production or urine, blood in
urine, lethargy, loss or appetite, and fever.  A blockage of the urinary
tract or kidney problems can be life threatening if not treated immedately.
These types of infections need to be treated by a veterinarian.

Below are links with more information on these topics.

http://www.vetinfo.com/dbladder.html

http://www.petinfocenter.com/dogs/bladder_stones.htm

http://www.macatawa.org/~wilcox_k/kidney.html

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Chewing Wood

HELPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP   my cocker spaniel wont stop chewing our wood door, she does it when she is left outside . We have tried ,hot sause on the wood , plastic covers , etc. Any suggestions , thanks in advance.

Chewing Wood Response - 

It sounds like from your description that chewing the wood is just a symptom of the problem.  Have you considered the real problem might be seperation anxiety?  Most dogs that have behavior problems such as seperation anxiety can also develop obsessive disorders such as chewing which soothes them in their anxiety.
 

The first step towards stopping the chewing is to understand separation anxiety.  Obviously, our dogs would like to be around us all day, therefore, when we are gone for prolonged periods of time, they get lonely and can develop bad behaviors.   To combat separation anxiety do not make a big deal about leaving or arriving home.  This means no excited hellos or goodbyes.   Prolonged goodbyes only signal the dog that you are leaving and heightens their anxiety.    Below is a link with more information about separation anxiety.

The next step is to break the cycle of obsessive chewing.  Get a soda can, fill it with some rocks or pennies.  Plan a training session by letting your dog know you are leaving.    Sneak back into the house and stay hidden.  When your dog starts the chewing, shake the can vigorously to distract him.  Distract him every time he chews, until you are ready to "return" (return when not chewing).  When you are home, use the terms "no chew" when training.   Give this command when leaving the house.   Leave for short periods at first, slowly extending the time away.   Try leaving a radio on or tape with soothing sounds of your voice.

The third step is to keep your dog occupied when you are gone for long periods of time.  Give them something to do when you leave such as a special toy and special treats that are only given when you leave.  Treats should be something that occupies their time.  Try a game such as hide-n-seek with toys and treats or have a surprise visit scheduled from a neighbor or friend (a walk) to break-up the day.  Exercise is also a great way to keep your dog from distructive behaviors.  A tired dog is a sleepy dog.  Go for an extended walk or run prior to leaving the house.  

 Dog Game:  Teach your dog how to play hide-n-seek to liven up their day!  Start by having lots of treats available.  Choose one word for the game such as "seek".  Tell you dog to seek and then drop a treat on the floor near him.   Do this several times until you can start moving the treat farther and farther away.  Be sure to make your dog  sit and stay until you have said the designated word.  Eventually move the treat into another room and, even harder still, eventually hiding it in places for your dog to search it out.  This can also be an effective training tool for distracting dogs from unwanted behavior such as digging, chewing, barking, and even anxiety upon you leaving.

We also recommend that dogs suffering from anxiety problems be crate trained.  The idea of crate training is to provide a safehaven for your dog when you are not around, relieving their anxiety.  Below is a link to information on crate training and some info from our website about crate training for chewing problems:

Crate Training for Chewing Problems – During the training period, if you can’t supervise your dog’s activities, you should have him in a crate with approved chew toys.  The crate will help your dog deal with his sense of anxiety when you are away by creating a safehaven.  When your dog is out of the crate, interrupt and redirect any bad chewing behavior by giving and approved chew toy from out of a “toy bag”.  Approved chew toys should be kept in this toy bag during the training period, giving you the authority over the toys.  Your dog will soon learn that he is only allowed to play with these toys on your terms.  The toys will then become a reward for your dog to use when you are not home.  An additional training aide is lots of exercise.  A tired dog will be less likely to have the energy to chew on things.

Crate Training How To - Crate training is simply creating a safehaven for your dog.  Dogs in the wild live in dens which are very small areas where they feel protected.  In the wild, dogs keep their dens clean and use them as a safehaven.  Crate training is good   for a variety of training problems such as potty training, chewing and anxiety.   The premise behind crate training is to keep your dog in its' crate whenever you are unable to supervise its' activities such as when you are in the shower, gone to work, etc.  This teaches your dog that he is safe and can count on you to come back and take care of his needs.  For potty training, let your puppy out at designated times for going to the potty area (usually after eating, playing or sleeping).  The potty area should be in the same spot each time.  If you are consistent with your schedule, your puppy will learn to follow and rely on this schedule.  For chewing, only let your dog have approved chew toys when in the crate so that they are new and considered a treat.  This lets your dog know you are in control of the toys and he can expect to chew on them when he is in his crate.  For dogs with separation anxiety, crate training can be such a relief to them because they do consider it a safehaven.  Leave your dog in the crate for very short periods of time with you close by and the door open.   Always talk and reassure him.  Give him treats when he is calm and behaving properly.  Eventually close the door and slowly extend the amount of time spent in the crate.  Always leave treats and toys to keep them occupied.  During the training period, it is important to keep your dog in the crate at night.  You will find that eventually your dog will ask to spend time in his crate.

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http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/separtn.htm

 
 

 

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Hot Spots - Our 2 year old Golden Retreiver keeps getting "hot spots" on his legs
that he keeps irritating by licking it all the time and taking off all his
fur.  What is the best course of treatment/prevention for this problem.
We've tried using an antibiotic cream but is there something better.  What
causes these irritations anyway?  Any information/advise would be greatly
appreciated.

Hot Spots Response - You are not alone!  I have answered several emails about this problem this week.  Just in case you missed the hot spot section in our website, I have
copied it below and have also added some links with lots of information on
hots spots.

Hot Spots are an area on your dog's skin that has been irritated by bug
bites, rashes from an allergy, or an injury.  These irritants then can cause
itching and excessive licking.  They become "hot spots" when your animal
continuously licks that same spot causing a secondary skin infection.  Hot
spots are easily treated by clipping the hair away from the irritated area,
cleaning and applying antibiotic ointments and receiving anti-inflammatory
and antibiotic shots from your veterinarian.  The hard part is keeping your
dog from licking this area habitually.   Your dog may have learned that it
is soothing to lick this spot over and over.   Your veterinarian has special
collars and a new metallic tape that is foul tasting to keep your dog from
continually licking the affected area.   If this is a constant problem, then
retraining is necessary.  When you are able to be near your dog, leash him
and have him next to you at all times.  It is important to have treats or
toys available so that you can redirect any bad behavior.  If your dog
starts to lick repetitively, get his attention and give him a toy or treat.
Get your dog interested in something besides the licking.

We highly recommend the new metallic bad tasting tape!

Links:

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/hotspots.html

http://www.golden-retriever.com/hotspots.html

http://www.thepetcenter.com/exa/hotspots.html

http://www.peteducation.com/dogs/hot_spots.htm

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Behavior Change - This past week, my dog has peed in the house 3 times and has started
growling at my mother when she disciplines him. He even snapped at her
once. What can I do to solve this problem?

Behavior Change Response - I assume from your description this is new behavior...any new or change in
behavior as well as change in appetite are the first indications of illness.
When a normal calm dog suddenly becomes snappy, the first thought is pain.
We strongly suggest you take your dog to your vet as soon as possible for a
complete check-up.

Because you indicate that he is "peeing in the house" (which I assume is
new) and has "started growling and snapping" this could be an indication
that he has some type of bladder infection, kidney stones, etc.  that are
causing him pain.  Dogs in pain even though normally gentle, can get snippy.
Bladder infections are common problems in dogs and need to be treated with
antibiotics.  Symptoms of bladder infections are increased need to urinate
with little urine, pain upon urination, blood in urine, fever and lethargy.

Once you have ruled out any medical problems, behavioral problems should be
considered.  Is he an adopted dog?  Have you had him a long time?  Is he
displaying submissive behavior which can sometimes turn into aggression?
Socialization training is a good place to start with a submissive or
frightened dog.

Our information is provided as a resource and is not meant to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.



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Rash

I have a 2 year old half Newfoundland neutered male dog. I have recently discovered a large red area on his stomach near his penis. It seams to be slightly swollen. I shaved the area to let it breath and so I could see it. Is it possible this could be a heat rash?

Rash Response - 

We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Our information is meant as a resource.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.  If the problem continues for more than a couple of days and/or seems to get worse after you have cleaned the area, please take your dog to the vet.
 
It would be impossible to tell from your description what actually this red bump is without seeing it.  It does not sound like heat rash because that generally would not be one bump but would be spread over the stomach area.  However, there are several possibilities that come to mind.  It could be one of several things such as; hernia, bug bite, infected hair folicle, hot spot, or other skin irritation.
 
Below are links that have more information on these subjects;
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.peteducation.com/cats_dogs/diaphhernia.htm (doesn't sound like this but sent anyway)
 
http://www.thepetcenter.com/sur/ph.html (doesn't sound like this but sent it anyway)
 
Our suggestion for hot spots:
 
This problem is an area on your dog's skin that has been irritated by bug bites, rashes from an allergy, or an injury.  These irritants then can cause itching and excessive licking.  They become "hot spots" when your animal continuously licks that same spot causing a secondary skin infection.  Hot spots are easily treated by clipping the hair away from the irritated area, cleaning and applying antibiotic ointments and receiving anti-inflammatory and antibiotic shots from your veterinarian.  The hard part is keeping your dog from licking this area habitually.   Your dog may have learned that it is soothing to lick this spot over and over.   Your veterinarian has special collars and a new metallic tape that is foul tasting to keep your dog from continually licking the affected area.   If this is a constant problem, then retraining is necessary.  When you are able to be near your dog, leash him and have him next to you at all times.  It is important to have treats or toys available so that you can redirect any bad behavior.  If your dog starts to lick repetitively, get his attention and give him a toy or treat.  Get your dog interested in something besides the licking. 
 

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Touching Puppies - How old does a puppy have to be before you can touch them?

Touching Puppies Response - 

I am assuming that the mother of the puppies is your pet and in your care...if this is not the case, please do not touch the puppies so that the mother does not become distressed and move them. 
 
It is definetly ok to touch them!  However, do not pick them up right away.  In general, it is best to keep handling to a minimum for their first week to 2 weeks old.  Young mothers can become distressed if the puppies are disturbed.  Puppies are very susceptible to cold and drafts, they should not be away from their mother and huddled siblings for extended periods of time for the first two weeks.  
 
It is said that early handling helps create a better bond between puppies and humans and makes socialization easier.  By handling we mean talking and petting.  When you do start picking the puppies up at around 2 weeks of age, care should be taken when picking the puppies up.   Always cradle the puppy in your hands supporting the legs.  Never carry the puppy around by it's stomach. 
 
Here are some links with good puppy information:
 
 
 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not meant to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.
  

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Grass Eating - I"m not sure if you are able to help me but here goes. My six month old pup (border collie/ smithfield) eats grass like she is a grazing cow. Every time she goes out to do her business the first five minutes she eats grass. Her diet consists of a lot of vegetables and meat, pasta, rice. Basically she eats very little that we dont eat. Am I not giving her something that she needs? Or is it just a puppy thing? I hope you can help me with this problem.

 

Grass Eating Response - 

Don't worry your not alone.  Grass eating is a very common and normal behavior in dogs and cats.  It is believed to be associated with an upset stomach.  Have you noticed that your dog has diarrhea?  This can also be an indication of an upset stomach.  Most dogs that eat grass immediately throw-up after eating the grass.  It is believed that this is the way they relieve gas pressure and other stomach upsets.  Try feeding your dog smaller meals at regular intervals (not large meals once per day) and  try feeding an allergy diet like lamb and rice or fish and potatoes (stay away from wheat products).  Most dogs that experience stomach upsets are associated with some type of food allergy.  It also doesn't hurt to supplement any diet with a daily multi-vitamin.
 
If this is a change in the normal behavior for your dog, this can be an indication of illness.  Any change in eating habits or behavior can be the first sign of illness and should be checked by your veterinarian.
 
Below are some links to sites that have information on grass eating and allergy diets:
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Baby/Dog Introductions - My husband and I are expecting our first child.  We have a 2 year old chocolate lab.  She is a great dog and we want to be sure we do everything
we can to prepare her for our newborn.  Do you have any tips for getting her
acclimated?

Baby/Dog Response - Congratulations!  I am glad to hear you are preparing before the baby comes rather than after it arrives.  I am also glad to hear you have a
Labrador...they are excellent with children!  I have copied our section
under Advanced Dog - Preparing for Your New Baby for you below as well as a
couple of links:

Preparing Pets For Your New Baby - Cat or Dog:  Obviously a new baby in the
family brings changes for everyone.   Sometimes we forget that it also means
changes in our pet's lives.  They have the same feelings of being left-out,
abandonment and confusion.  The best way to reduce the amount of stress on
your pet is to start socialization with other children and retraining  prior
to the new arrival.  The first step is socialization and involves
introducing, playing and handling by children.  If your pet is nervous, try
having the child give treats to your pet and praising your pet when he takes
the treats.   (Do not let a child handle a pet that is in any way
aggressive!).  Progress slowly always reinforcing good behavior with treats.
The second step is to retrain or train your pet as to who is the boss in the
house.  By retraining, we mean reinforcing the simplest commands and
establishing dominance.  By establishing dominance you set the rules on how
your pet should act around the new arrival.   Dominance training includes
making your dog sit and wait to be invited to sniff the new baby, making
your dog sit prior to feeding, not letting him on the couch unless invited
(this is your territory not his), no lap sitting unless invited, not letting
him sleep in your bed (especially if you plan to have the baby sleep in your
bed), keeping him off the counters, and keeping toys in a box until time to
play (this is helpful when little hands start playing with dog toys).  The
night before you bring the new baby home from the hospital, bring a
receiving blanket that has been used by the baby home for the dog to smell.
Again, when introducing baby and dog, make your dog sit and be invited
before coming to say hello.  Use happy voices when introducing.  Remember
that your dog can sense if you are uncomfortable or nervous.  Last but not
least, give your dog as much extra attention and love as you can!!

http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/babyarrival.htm

http://www.metrokc.gov/lars/animal/Educate/cassidy/dog/dog31.htm


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Arthritis

I have a 10 year old red heeler and she is limping alot.
It is mainly her back legs that she limps on and she tends to limp badly when she has just got up from a sleep and then after 15mins of a brisk walk.
She likes to hold one leg up for while one day and not walk on it and then the other leg another day.
Is this athiritis? If so, what can be done to prevent it and help her? And most important, is she in pain?

Arthritis Response - 

We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Our information is meant as a resource.  Your first resouce should always be your veterinarian. 
 
You don't say how long this has been going on....  If it is a new problem (last few days) she may have injured herself.  However, from your description, I will assume this is an ongoing problem and that she may well have arthritis.  The symptoms your describe, especially the slow getting up and her age, are fairly typical of arthritis.  Arthritis is definetly painful and only gets worse.  We recommend that you see your vet for a complete check-up and treatment for her pain (which is treatable).  
 
There are many other options in addition to what your vet prescribes that can be helpful and are found at your local pet store.  Many types of senior foods come with a new additive called Glucosamine and Chondrotin which are said to help joint mobility and pain.  Ask for them at your local pet store.  There are supplements such as MSM and Yucca.  Ask your vet about these dietary supplements.  

Glucosamine supplement for Dogs - click on the picture for more info

 

 

 

I have copied a section from our Pet Tips of the Week about MSM:

 
MSM for Arthritis and Hip Displaysia -  Do you have an older pet that has trouble getting around or is stiff in the mornings?  Then you may want to discuss the benefits of MSM with your veterinarian.  MSM's complete scientific name is methylsulfonylmethane.  MSM is not new, it is simply a natural nutrient called sulfur that is used by our bodies to promote healthy joints and bones.  It is most helpful with inflammation and pain.  This dietary aide has been widely used in veterinary medicine for horses and only recently have the benefits been realized in companion animals and humans.  MSM permeates the cell membranes of arthritic joints, allowing swelling to be reduced, and pain to be eased.  Many older dogs have experienced relief with MSM.  MSM also helps release accumulated toxins from cells and is said to help most ailments such as skin problems and can boost energy levels.  Because MSM is not a drug but a natural nutrient, it is not toxic and has no affects on other drugs being taken.   Discuss MSM with your veterinarian to see if it may be helpful for your pet.  Below are some links with additional information:

http://www.steedfeed.com/msmpet.htm

http://www.lifetimesolutions.com/products/msm.htm

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Flea Remedies - We have a blue heeler cross (our baby!) she has been badly infested with fleas from the vast amount of sand in the back yard of our new house.Although she loves to be outside we have decided to keep her in -with frequent time in the front garden- and daily walks. We had a visit from the 'dog wash Lady' who uses only herbal products but as lovely as our girl now smells the fleas are still present.I would like to ask if you know of a natural flea repellant we could try at home- I am opposed to harsh chemicals on animals and would be happy to cook up a home made remedy providing it would be effective.I was told of a lemon wash but this is supposed to be very slow acting, so any ideas?

Flea Remedies Response - 

Did you see our Pet Tips of the Week or our Advanced Dogs.  There is information in these sections about flea control and several ideas for natural remedies.  I have copied the information below (sorry I was unable to change the font color?!).  There is a section for Holistic Flea Control:
 
Flea Season Remedies - Ahh Spring!  This is the start of the annual fight against fleas and ticks.  Getting a head start before you see fleas is the key!  We have put together a schedule below for flea control as well as natural alternative ways to control fleas.  To control your flea and tick problem, it is important to know that you must treat not only your pet but their environment as well.  It is recommended that you incorporate several types of flea and tick control for the best results.  This involves shampoos, powders, flea collars, bug bombs (foggers), and yard spray.  Shampoos and powders only work for a couple of days and need to be reapplied.  Collars work for longer periods but only work around the upper body area.  Foggers and yard sprays last for about 3 weeks.  Most products do not kill the eggs of the fleas and ticks. Therefore, you will need to treat the fleas and ticks in stages as the new eggs are hatched about every 2-3 weeks.  The following is a recommended schedule to follow: <?XML:NAMESPACE PREFIX = O />

Please check with your veterinarian and doctor prior to using any of these treatments around children or when treating young animals and cats.  Be sure to also check for compatible chemicals. 

·        Week 1 – Shampoo, powder, and flea collar your pet.  Use a fogger for the inside of the house making sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.  Spray the outside yard with a flea and tick insecticide.

·        Week 2 – Shampoo and powder your pet.

·        Week 3 – Shampoo and powder your pet.

·        Week 4 – Shampoo and powder your pet.  Use a fogger again for the inside of the house making sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.  Spray the outside yard with a flea and tick insecticide.  Replace flea collar.

·        You may need to follow this treatment for another four weeks.

Other alternatives for Flea Control:  Products such as Program, Advantage and Frontline can be more costly but are very effective and eliminate the need for frequent chemical baths, dustings, etc.  These products work by virtually eliminating the fleas from reproducing.  These products are generally applied to the skin or given orally once per month.   

Holistic Flea Control:  Below are links to sites that have information on holistic flea control.  They use natural alternatives in place of chemicals.  Some of these alternatives include; Diatomaceous Earth, Pyrethrum Dust, Borax, Herbal Sprays, and Herbal Oils.  Another natural alternative for your yard are Beneficial Nematodes.  These Nematodes are non-segmented worms which occur naturally in the soil.  They eat ants, flea larvae, ticks and other garden pests.  They do not harm "good" garden bugs.  They can be purchased at any local garden center.  Nematodes work by seeking out host insects and entering their prey through body openings and emit an endo-toxin that results in death for the host insect within 48 hours. The nematodes reproduce in the dead host and then their offspring feed on the dead host.  The offspring then emerge to seek out new hosts.  

http://www.altvetmed.com/fleas.html - Alternative Flea Control Article

http://www.healthypetnet.com/pamzuppo/ - Holistic Products

http://www.healthypetnet.com/products/care/mist.asp?realname=10020761  

Most flea control remedies are very effective but have to be implemented on a regular schedule to catch the flea life cycle.  Remember that new fleas are born every 2 to 3 weeks.  Also, do try adding garlic to her daily diet, as this works well on some dogs but not all.

 

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Potty Training

Hi! I have a female yorkie named "Daisy" that is 6 months old. She will not bark to go out. She will sit by the door quietly, if we are not watching her  to let her out she will relieve herself in front of the door. Please help! She also does this wierd thing with her feet. I have not determined if it is related to her having to go to the bathroom or not, but she sort of scratches her feet real fast sort of like she is wiping them off. ( It's sort of like a cute little dance or something!) But I watch her real closely and have never noticed her doing this after she has had a bowel movement. I have seen other dogs do something similar on the grass after they have relieved themselves. I welcome any suggestions or comments.
 

Potty Training Response - 

I have just heard of a great new potty training method that is supposed to work well with the dog as well as the owner.  My friend tried it with her puppy and swears by it.  The method is the same as normal potty training (i.e.; consistent schedule, same potty area, key word, etc.) but adding an object that makes a sound.  In my friends case, she hung a bell (dog level) next to the back door.  Each time she took the dog out for two days, she would ring the bell.  After the second day she helped her dog push up against the bell.  She said it took about a week but the dog caught on real quickly and now rings the bell each time he has to go out.  The key is to be consistent and prompt when called.  Check out the link below for more info on potty training:
 
I am not sure what you are describing about the "dance".  Most dogs cover their feces by scratching at the grass.  I would guess that from her age that she may be starting her first heat.  Has she had a first heat yet?  Could this behavior be related?  You said that she doesn't do this after a bowel movement....is this a new behavior?  Any changes in behavior, appetite, or activity can be the first indication of illness.  Was she ever completely potty trained and the recently became unpotty trained?  This could be a sign of urinary infection or other problems.  If you suspect she is having a medical problem, please take her to the vet. 
 
 

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Crate Training

I purchased a 3 month old Yorkie, who is now 4 months old.  He starts barking im the middle of the night and we would like any tips on how to keep him quiet at night. We have tried leaving him in his crate at night with my slipper, which helps somewhat.  We tried leaving him in the utility room with his bed, food, water and a night light on, and not in the crate.  He awakens a very early hours and barks continuously.  He is not house trained yet.  My husband is ready to muzzle him at night.  Help!

Crate Training Response - 

Don't worry you are not alone...all puppies go through these stages.  First, please keep him in his crate.  He will quickly learn that if you take him out to soothe him when he barks, he will keep barking.  He should only be allowed out during the night to go potty. He is still very young and will bark or whimper for attention at night until he is about 6 months old.  At 4 months of age, your puppy requires you to take him potty every 3 to 4 hours.  They are not old enough until about 6 months to hold it overnight.  This means getting up once or twice during the night.  The minute you hear him wake and start whimpering, take him outside for potty only, no play,  and no attention.  Use key words like "potty time" when taking him out and "sleep" when returning him to his crate.  Keep him on a strict schedule.  This will help him feel safe and know what is expected of him. 
 
Things to keep him distracted in his crate....try a hot water bottle to keep him warm, try a puppy warmer (sold in pet stores), try a clock that plays soft music timed to go off in the early morning to keep him company or let him sleep with one of your unlaundered t-shirts for your smell.
 
Below are some links with more information about Yorkie puppies:
 
The key is patience, time and consistent schedules!  Remember he will grow out of this stage. 

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Colitis, Blood in Stool

My dog has had diarrhea with traces of blood. I took her to the vet & he said that it was an allergy in her colon & is Treating it with metronidazole. What is the allergy that it is being treated?
      

Colitis Response - 

From your description it sounds like your dog has an irritable bowel or colitis.  Causes of irritable bowel can sometimes by attributed to allergies.  Symptoms of irritable bowel include diarrhea and blood in the stool.  Often there is no specific reason for the "flare ups".  These flare ups can also be produced by stress, food changes, etc... Has your vet recommended any special dietary needs?  You may want to consider a very bland diet or allergy diet such as lamb and rice, chicken, rice, eggs, pasta, etc.... Below are some links with more information on this condition:
 
 
http://www.vetinfo.com/dcolitis.html (talks about the medication)
 

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Ear Pain Infection

My cocker spaniel gets "occassional" ear infections that seen to present themselves quite quickly.  Is there ANYTHING my precious pup can be given for pain if we can't get him to his vet immediately?  He lets you know when he hurts, and I always feel so sad for him if it is the middle of the night or a wait to see his vet, and he has to suffer until we can get his pain under control with ear medication.
 

Ear Pain Response - 

Unfortunately, Cocker Spaniels (and most flop eared dogs) are more prone to ear infections.  Because their ear is constantly covered by their ear flap this causes mositure to be trapped in the ear and breeds bacteria causing the infections.  Some infections are also attributable to food or airborne allergies.  Have your tried an allergy diet on your Cocker such as lamb and rice or chicken and rice?  Also, dog foods with wheat products are a known allergen. 
 
About pain treatment...dogs should never be given Tylenol, Motrin, Advil, etc...(acetominophen and ibupropen).   However, dogs with arthritis are given coated aspirin for pain relief.  Check with your vet to see if aspirin can be used as a pain reliever for ear infections.  However, do not let the pain relief mask the true problem and delay treatment.  The only treatment for ear infections is antibiotics. 
 
Did you see our section on ear infections about prevention?  If not, I have copied it below:
 
"Symptoms of ear infections and yeast infections are smelly ears, black goo and pain when touched.  If your dog has this problem, the infection will first need to be treated by a veterinarian.   Once the infection is cleared up by your veterinarian, try stopping the problem before it starts by religiously cleaning the ears with a mixture of 1/2 rubbing alcohol and 1/2 vinegar.  This mixture is only to be used if there are no open sores in the ear canal.  This mixture is great for helping to keep the ear canal dry and free of bacteria build-up which causes the infections.  Use a Q-Tip dipped in the mixture and gently wipe the ear clean until there is no more dirt coming out of the ear on the Q-Tip.  The ear canal of a dog is shaped similar to a 90 degree angle or the letter L.  When cleaning the ear be careful not to force the Q-Tip past the angle."
 
Below are links with more info on ear infections:
 
 
 

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Seizure or Stroke? - today my  cocker had what appeared to be a seizure how can i tell if it wasnt a stroke  the symptoms are: all muscles were rigid and he started a paddling motion he could not stand up and would fall over if he tried  he drooled and lost his pee please tell me what i can do until i reach my vet  

Seizure or Stroke Response

Please try and contact your vet immediately as seizures or strokes in an older dog are serious medical problems.  We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.  However, we can provide you with information and resources.
 
Symptoms of seizures include uncontrollable muscle activity (your dog can appear to be in a rigid state, loss of urine or stool, drooling and altered behavior.  They are usually short lived (2-3 minutes) and afterwards your dog will return to normal (about 10 minutes).  There is not much you can do during a seizure except prevent injury to your dog.  You can try wrapping him in a towel but the best thing to do is move all furniture and objects that may injure him.  Strokes can also have similar symptoms to seizures and can leave your dog confused, moving in a circular motion, and have can a lasting affect.  If your dog has had a stroke, again, there is little you can do except get him to the vet as soon as possible.  
 
Both of these types of emergencies require immediate veterinary attention.  There are always underlying medical issues associated with these emergencies. 

 

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Yorkie Gasping For Air - I have a year old yorkie and lately she has been having spells where she gasps for air, sometimes as many as 6 to 8 times per day.  The vet says
it is probably allergies, put her on an antihistimine and says she will
get better when spring is over.  She doesn't seem to be getting better.
Is this a Yorkie thing or what?  She weighs 4 pounds.

Yorkie Gasp For Air Response - I am glad to hear you took your dog to the vet first!  We are not veterinarians and cannot provide veterinary advice, care or treatment.
However, we can provide information and resources to help you find your
answers.  Your veterinarian should always be your first resource.

I am not sure if it is a "Yorkie Thing" but there seems to be a lot of
Yorkies with similar problems.  I found the following websites that have
great information on the subject:

http://yorkieviews.com/healthfacts.htm (go to collapsed trachea and reverse
sneeze below it)

http://www.shooterdog.com/alexfaq3.htm (go about five or six questions down
to cough question) Great FAQ on Yorkies!

If your Yorkie is not getting better, please take her back to the vet.

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Eats Roots

I have a 7 month old neutered female brown german shepherd crossed with collie.  Her main traits are german shepherd.   My question is whether my puppy is missing some vitamin or dietary need that is causing her to dig up plant roots and eat only the roots.   She has done this with rhubarb plants and holly hocks.   Even when I was cleaning my yard for the summer and dug up a small tree sapling she immediately went for the root area and ate it.   She eats well with a mix of dry puppy and dog food and has gotten a clean bill of health with the vet.   She weighs about 70 pounds and is quite active.   She has gotten all her shots and is on a 12 month heart worm regimen.   I am as a loss as to what is causing this---is it natural for the shepherd---I have had dogs before and have never has this type of continual problem.   If she is missing something in her diet I want to get her what is needed rather than have her do this.  She also will eat raw wood(not furniture) whenever she gets the chance.  While trimming a tree in the yard she took the limb I had cut down which was green and stipped all the bark off and chewed on the green wood inside.
 
She is a digger also in digging holes and I am presently working of training her to stop this and in spending more time with her in case she is digging out of boredom.  
 
Any insight you can provide or any sources you can provide on this matter would be appreciated.
 

Eats Roots Response

Dog's develop odd behaviors out of boredom, obcessive soothing, or simply by accident.  She may have simply discovered, by accident when digging one day, that the roots tasted good to her so she continues to do go for the roots.  Since she is still a puppy, she may be satisfying her need to chew (teething) and happens to prefer the feel of wood and roots.  She may also be trying to add a little fiber to her diet.  Some dogs who like to eat plants and wood also have related stomach problems.  Has she ever had bouts with diarrhea?   
 
You are taking the right step in spending more time with her.  Are you also keeping her active (exercise)?  A tired dog gets into less trouble.   I have copied below the section we have on help for a digger (in case you did not find it):
 
"Dogs dig for coolness, boredom, and smells.  If your dog only digs during the hot months of summer, try supplying a shaded area or a child sized pool to cool off in.  Try making sure there are no odors attracting your dog such as animal odors (gophers, cat feces, etc.) and gas lines.   To deter your dog from a favorite spot, you can purchase dog and cat repellent spray at your pet store and we have also heard of putting dog poop in the favorite hole.   If you would like to try distracting your dog from bad behavior, shake a soda can filled with rocks to get his attention and then redirect his attention elsewhere.   Why not build a sandbox for playtime!  Hide various treasures such as bones, chew toys, balls, and treats.  This creates an "approved" digging spot for your dog and keeps him challenged and exercised.   This can help dogs with "separation anxiety" problems giving your pet something to do when you are not available.  Be sure to monitor his digging so he is aware that this is the acceptable play area and not to dig in some other place in the yard."

If she has developed this behavior because she is having teething problems, we recommend soaking a rope toy in chicken broth and then freezing overnight.  This gives your dog a proper chew toy, a treat, and the coolness soothes their teething.  Any type of toy that promotes continual chewing like rawhide bones, flavored dental bones, etc. are great. 

If you feel that she is having diet issues or stomach issues, try adding some veggies and starches to her diet.  Carrots, corn, peas, rice, potatoes and oatmeal are tasty.  You don't say what you are feeding her...since she is a puppy, she will need to be on a quality growth formula until she is about 1 1/2 years old.  Try and buy the best quality you can afford.  There really is a difference.    You should also be feeding her at least twice per day until she is 1 1/2 years old.  Not necessarily more food, just spread out over the day.   She may also need a daily vitamin.  Vitamins make great treats.    

She is also still very much a puppy and will probably outgrow this.  It sounds like she has a loving home and with training and patience she will be a great dog!

Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian. 

 

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Adopting Blind Puppy

I am being given the opportunity to adopt a young female pit-bull, boxer mix who is totally and non-correctively blind.  She will, if adopted, live with a 4 year old male shepherd mix.  What special care, if any, will be necessary to assure a successful acceptance into the existing household; and how logical would the adoption actually be?

Adopting Blind Puppy Response - 

Before adopting the dog, be sure to introduce the dogs and make sure they are compatable.  Even if they are compatable away from the home be aware that you may have some territorial issues when introduced at home.  New introductions are always hard and can take up to a week or two for everybody to settle into a new routine.  Try having the adoptee sleep on one of your unlaundered t-shirts overnight and then bring it home for your dog to smell and be around and vice versa.  Make first introductions out in front of the house in semi-neutral territory with both dogs on a leash.  After all is calm, bring both dogs into the backyard together, still keeping on the leash.  When all is still calm, let them off the leash but under strict supervision.  Be sure to stay near the blind dog to reassure when experiencing new smells and obstacles.  Introduce both dogs to the household together.  Reassurance for both dogs is needed to keep jealousy to a minimum.
 
Obviously because the new dog is blind you are going to have unique challenges.  We recommend before bringing the new dog home, you give it old unlaundered clothes, some of your dog's toys, bedding, etc. so that she can recognize your smell.  Remember that because she is blind, she relies heavily on her sense of smell.  We also recommend that before bringing her home, you spray items around the house with one particular scent (like dog perfume).  You can even use this scent to mark the boundries of the yard.  This will allow her to recognize that there is an object associated with that scent.  As well as the scent that marks the boundries outside.  When introducing her to the house, take her slowly from room to room and allow her to "smell" each object.  She will overtime memorize where these objects are and no longer need the scent.  However, when introducing new furniture or other items to the house, you can spray them with this scent to let her know it is there.  Be sure to not overpower the house with the scent.  Mark each object with a tiny amount.
 
She also relies on her hearing as much as her sense of smell.  Therefore, we recommend that if your dog does not have dog tags, get two tags to attach to his collar (making a clinking noise) or some type of small bell that announces his presence.  Dogs that are blind or deaf are easily frightened when approached suddenly.  Always talk to her to let her know where you are.  She is relying on you for assurance and safety.  If she trusts you and your current dog with her safety, you will have no problems.  Trust, reassurance and lots of love can make it work. 
 
Dogs with special needs make wonderful pets and you will be surprised how easily she will fit in and make the adjustments.  My sister has a dog that is deaf that she has taught to read hand signals.
 
Below are some links I found on tips for blind dogs and their owners:
 
 
 
 

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Play Biting - Our 8 month old Labrador is really lovely.  But he continues to play bite.
He is not aggressive,  and does it when he gets excited. But his jaws are
strong now and it has to stop, but how?

Play Biting Response - There are several options to help reduce and retrain your puppy from biting;

1.   Play biting can a show of dominance in an older puppy.  If you let it
continue it can become an issue as the dog gets older.  Dogs are pack
animals and live with a pack leader.  You must assume the role of pack
leader and let your dog know that this is unacceptable behavior.  When your
dog starts to bite, you immediately give a sharp no and immediately end
playtime.  Ignore him for at least 5 minutes.  When he is displaying the
proper behavior after the 5 minutes, resume playtime and reward him for
playing properly.  This can take a few play sessions for him to get the idea
that when he bites, he gets no attention.

To establish your role as the "pack leader" try these tips;  feed him after
you have eaten (preferably outsite, away from the table),  make him sit
before you give him his dinner bowl, do not let him go through doors before
you (make him sit and wait until you call him), and keep him off the
furniture and beds until invited.

2.  Play biting can also be attributed to a dog that is allowed to play with
anything that makes him happy.  Try using a toy box to hold his toys.  He is
only allowed to play with these toys when he is on good behavior.  The
minute he starts biting, put the toys back in the toy box.  Use the toys as
acceptable chew things and as a reward.  If he is allowed access to the toys
all the time, he will become bored of the toys.  The idea is to use them as
a special treat.

3.  Puppies teeth until they are about 1 to 2 years old.  To help reduce any
pain associated with teething, provide a rope toy soaked in chicken broth
and then frozen overnight.  The chewing and coolness with relieve any pain
he may have in his teeth.

http://www.peteducation.com/behavior/puppy_biting.htm


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Ingesting and Vomiting

Hi. I have an eight year old Lab Pointer mix named Zack.  Throughout his life he has periodically had episodes where he goes around the house ingesting as many foreign objects as he can.  Not just plant matter, when he is really feeling sick he has been known to shred and ingest bed sheets, he ate a hole in our sofa and ate the foam inside.  He licks hair from the floor and plastic bags.  Now trust me I’ve done some research and nobody can seem to tell me anything new. He is not “trying to supplement his diet”  he feels really awful and is trying to feel better by making himself  vomit.  I hope you could tell me something new and helpful. Possible causes and treatments or solutions (medicinal or homeopathic and not just rice, bananas and live yogurt).

Thank you. Jeffrey Harris

Ingesting and Vomiting Response  - 

To start, we are not veterinarians and do not give veterinary advice, care or treatments.  Our information is provided as a resource and is not meant to replace veterinary advice, care or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.
 
You do not say if you have had your dog checked by your vet or what the diagnosis has been...My first thoughts were as I said earlier; bloat or intestinal upset.  You seem to feel that your dog has an upset stomach and is trying to comfort himself by vomiting.   It is very common for dogs to have upset stomachs caused by allergies, large meals, rough play, irritable bowels, etc.  One of the most common ways and instinctual activities of dogs with upset stomachs is to eat grass.  Have you tried providing your dog with a homegrown garden of grass indoors (I am assuming your dogs spends time indoors).  These can be easily made or purchased at your local pet store (mostly in the cat eisle).  Try different varieties and which attracts him most.  Indoor grass also will alleviate any allergies or poisons found in grass and plants from the backyard (ie; fertilizer). 
 
On a more serious note is it a possibility that your dog frequently experiences severe stomach pain associated with bloat?  Bloat can develop into a life threatening problem called Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV).  Basically bloat is a condition most commonly associated with big breed dogs and is believed to be caused by eating large meals quickly (and dogs who inhale their food), exercise or playtime after eating, and genetics.  Mild cases of bloat have symptoms of ; distended abdomens, gas, belching, foamy vomit, eating grass, etc.  When bloat develops into GDV it causes the stomach to twist thereby cutting of blood circulation to the stomach, effectively killing the stomach (a life-threatening problem).  Here are a couple of easy tips to prevent bloat or stomach pain;  make sure your dogs food is large kibble only and is not easily inhaled such as soft canned food, soft kibble, small kibble, etc. (the idea is to make them chew their food into small bites);  do not exercise your dog 1 hour before a meal or after mealtime (2 hours);  and keep meals small and several times per day instead of one big meal.  Below are some links to sites that have more information on bloat:
 
 
 
Is it possible that your dog has an allergy?  Have you tracked when your dog gets sick?  Keep a calendar of when he gets sick; time of day, after eating, after playing outside, etc.  It may help you to pinpoint what exactly is causing him to get an upset stomach.  He may be allergic to his food (my dog was and I didn't know it! wheat was the problem), he may be allergic to any number of inhalants outside, he may be allergic to the shampoo you use on him or flea products, etc.  To pinpoint more accurately if he has an allergy, you can have some skin test done to determine what is the allergy. 
 
Is it possible that your dog has an nervous personality and when he becomes stressed it causes an upset stomach and subsequently this behavior?  Again, the best way to determine if this is the case, keep a diary of his reactions and stomach problems.  Treating nervous behaviors can be difficult.  One way to treat nervousness is to distract your dog from uncomfortable situations (you first must know what is) and socialization to uncomfortable situations; such as dogs with a fear of thunder or other loud noises; fears of strangers, etc.  Socialization is best taught by a professional trainer and includes exposing the dog to lots of different situations under your control and helping your dog to trust you in every situation.  If the dog continues to show nervous or destructive behavior, a last resort would be to give medication perscribed by your vet.  Below is a link on socialization;
 
 
Another issue that is more notably seen in cats who are taken away from their mothers too early is the need to ingest or suck on various odd things such as plastic bags, wool blankets and other clothing, lick skin, etc.  Is your dog a rescue dog that may have some issues related to his puppyhood?  Abused dogs often have odd behaviors associated with their mistreatment and malnourishment.  Sometimes these types of behaviors can develop into an obsession or obsessive disorders as a way for the dog to soothe itself.  Again, this type of behavior is best treated by distraction and rewards.  Distraction is started by keeping your dog on a leash in the house and at your side at all times.  First this keeps the dog from these odd behaviors and second if the behavior is exhibited you can immediately distract him from the behavior with a toy or command and reward him, if he is able to be distracted, with a treat.  It sounds as though your dog only exhibits this behavior on certain occassions not all the time, like some cats. 
 
To answer your question about homeopathic treatments, I have copied a section we have on our site about various supplements and what they are used for as well as a link to some herbal websites:
 

9/1/00 - Holistic Care - We have been hearing more and more about the benefits of alternative medicines.  We thought the following list of vitamins, mineral and herbs and their uses would be helpful (this list is not meant to be a replacement of veterinary care, advice or traditional medicine but as a resource) Human dosages of vitamins, herbs and minerals are not proper dosages for pets.  Always consult your veterinarian before giving any new treatments.  Your pet should have a thorough check-up by a veterinarian before considering any new treatments.  This list is intended as a compliment to veterinary treatment and should only be used under the advice of a vet.:

Heart - Phosphorus, Potassium, Selenium

Blood - Folic Acid, Vitamin K, Copper, Iron, Sodium, Garlic, Echinacea, Ginko Biloba, Fatty Acids

Immune - Echinacea, Goldenseal, Grapeseed

Nervous System - Potassium, Amino Acids, L-Tryptophan, Catnip

Body Tissues & Organs - Vitamin C, Magnesium, Sodium, Beta Carotene, Feverfew, Yucca, Grapeseed

Digestive - Vitamin B, Folic Acid, Manganese, Acidophilus, Bran, Garlic, Aloe Vera

Anti-Oxidant - Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Zinc, Bee Pollen, Rose Hips, Wheat Germ Oil, Goldenseal, Grapeseed

Skin & Hair - Biotin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Copper, Sulfur, Zinc, Beta Carotene, Cod Liver Oil, Rose Hips, Aloe Vera, Fatty Acids, Grapeseed

Eyes - Vitamin A, Beta Carotene, Cod Liver Oil

Bones - Vitamin D, Calcium, Copper, Cod Liver Oil

Metabolism - Vitamin B, Folic Acid, Chromium, Brewers Yeast

Hormones & Glands - Vitamin A, Manganese, Zinc, Amino Acids, Iodine, Echinacea

Energy - Vitamin B, Phosphorus, Bee Pollen, Brewers Yeast, Ginseng

Before using any of these vitamins, herbs or minerals as a home treatment, you should first consult your veterinarian.  Your veterinarian should always be your first resource in diagnosis, treatment and dosages.  Be sure to check for toxicities with your veterinarian.

http://www.petmedicinechest.com/

http://www.healthypetnet.com/

Some of these ideas may sound far fetched but I wanted to cover all the ideas I could come up with so that you might discover what is causing your dogs behavior. 

 

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Labrador vs. Golden - Which has breed has the higher energy level-the Golden Retriever or the Labrador Retriever?  Which color of the Labrador,  black, yellow or
chocolate,  has the higher energy level?   Is there a difference of energy levels between male and female?  We now have low to medium energy male Golden Retriever and we would like to adopt a Chocolate Lab since we enjoy Retrievers.   Would that be a good
combination?  What would you recommend?

Also please inform me about yeast infections in dog's ears or tell me what
sites to go to for information.

Labrador vs. Golden Response

In my opinion, the labrador retriever has a higher energy level than a golden...however, as with any species, it can vary greatly depending on the individual.  In general, the labradors tend to be more active until they reach about 4 years of age.  By energy level, I refer to their excited behavior towards their owners and people.  They are just very friendly dogs.  They do require at least one good walk per day and a couple or rounds of fetch to keep them happy.  I have never heard of any particular color of labrador being more active than another, I believe they are all similar.  Color should be based on your preference.   As far as male or female...it is said that spaying or neutering will help to settle your dog down (both for male and female).  My belief is that spaying and neutering settles your dog down because they are no longer driven by their instincts to breed thereby reducing roaming, aggression, and territorial behaviors.  There should be no obvious differences between the male and female activity levels.  Since you said you are considering adopting be sure to spend lots of time with the adoptee (bring along your other dog) to be sure you make a good match.  I personally would highly recommend adopting any type of lab because we own a rescued black lab and he turned out to be the best dog we have ever had!  
 
I have copied the section we have on our website regarding ear infections available on our Advanced Tips - Dogs page for your information:
 
Ear Problems - Some breeds of dogs are susceptible to chronic ear problems due to the fact that their ears flap over allowing moisture and bacteria to be trapped in the ear.  Symptoms of ear infections and yeast infections are smelly ears, black goo and pain when touched.  If your dog has this problem, the infection will first need to be treated by a veterinarian.   Once the infection is cleared up by your veterinarian, try stopping the problem before it starts by religiously cleaning the ears with a mixture of 1/2 rubbing alcohol and 1/2 vinegar.  This mixture is only to be used if there are no open sores in the ear canal.  This mixture is great for helping to keep the ear canal dry and free of bacteria build-up which causes the infections.  Use a Q-Tip dipped in the mixture and gently wipe the ear clean until there is no more dirt coming out of the ear on the Q-Tip.  The ear canal of a dog is shaped similar to a 90 degree angle or the letter L.  When cleaning the ear be careful not to force the Q-Tip past the angle.  Preventative ear cleanings should be done once per week.
 

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Yorkie Information - I would like to know if yorkie dogs are real hyper dogs, because they are small?
Thanks, Karen

Yorkie Information Response - In general small dogs are not all "hyper"...the breed background determines what makes a hyper dog.  Since Yorkshire Terriers are derived from the
Terrier group, they are considered an active or "hyper" breed.  However,
they are not dogs that require a lot of exercise but a moderate level of
exercise.  It is more their personality that makes them seem hyper.  Yorkies
are inquisitive, smart and eager to please.  They also make excellent lap
dogs!

http://www.hoflin.com/B/YorkshireTerrier.html (be sure to visit their breed
reviews from owners)

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Pet Loss Support - Do you have any information on how to handle a family that is having a
hard time grieving for the lost of a pet? Thank you, Andrew

Pet Loss Support Response - I am sorry to hear that someone has lost a beloved pet...this is referred to in the pet world as crossing the Rainbow Bridge.  Below are some links to
sites that have information on different ways of grieving for a lost pet:

http://www.petloss.com/poems/maingrp/rainbowb.htm  (rainbow bridge story)

http://www.petloss.com/ (candle ceremony worldwide)

http://rainbowsbridge.com/chat.htm (chat room/message board)

Other suggestions to help with grieving include; starting a online photo
album to share with friends, asking your vet for pet loss support groups in
your area, adopt a bench, tree, etc. in memory of the beloved pet, and as
hard as it may seem, adding a new member to the family can make the grieving
easier.  Visit a shelter and adopt a pet in memory of your beloved pet.

http://www.cvma.org/petdoc.asp?ID=216 (pet loss support groups California)

http://www.deltasociety.org/dsn700.htm (groups by state)

Please send us a picture of the pet that has crossed the Rainbow Bridge and
I will post it on our Pet Pictures Page. 

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Drooling - Hello, my name is dan and i have an akita shepard mix 18 months old.
overnite she started to drool excessively. i mean puddles of drool. the
vet did not have a clue. we are watching her closely... she is eating on
schedule with normal potty stops and maintaining her energy. any ideas as to what may be
causing this? Thank you for any info you may provide. Dan

Drooling Response - I am glad to hear you took her to the vet for a complete check-up because
excessive drooling is not normal.  We are not veterinarians and cannot give
you veterinary care, advice or treatment.  However, we can give you some ideas and resources to
follow-up and hopefully discover what is the problem.  Our information is
meant as a resource and is not meant as a replacement for veterinary care,
advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your
veterinarian.

Four things come to mind when you describe your Akita's excessive drooling;
Foxtails (or other irritant like a stick), dental problems such as an
abcessed tooth, ulcer or tumor, an allergy, or poison.

Foxtails are a common problem in the spring when new grass is growing.
These are a type of grass seed that is v-shaped and has sharp microscopic
barbs to hold it in place.  They can easily become lodged in the mouth
between teeth and gums.  They are also dangerous in the ears and in between
paws.  They become easily infected and have to be surgically removed.  Has
your Akita recently been running through tall grass, chewing on grass
stalks, etc.?  Has she recently been chewing on any sticks that may have
gotten stuck in between her teeth?

Drooling is also a symptom of dental problems.  Your Akita is still young
for dental problems such as tartar build-up but some dogs require frequent
dental cleanings.  She may have injured her mouth and have an abcessed
tooth.  Symptoms of abcesses include drooling, fever, and red swollen gums.
Tumors also cause excessive drooling, however, she is quite young to develop
a dental tumor.

Allergies are funny things.  They cause a host of problems; one being
drooling.  Determining an allergy can be difficult.  The first thing to do
is to keep her on a strict schedule and pay particular attention to the time
of day when she is drooling.  Is it only at a particular time or after going
outside?   Have you recently changed dog foods or supplements?  Have you
changed shampoos, flea and tick spray, etc...

Last but not least is poisoning.  Poisonings can range from a mild reaction
to a severe reaction.  Mild reactions include drooling and panting.  Severe
reactions include vomiting, diarrhea, and convulsions.  There are many types
of poisonous household plants that can cause mild to severe reactions.  Have
your recently added any new plants that your Akita may be chewing on?  Have
your fertilized your lawn lately and your Akita is eating the grass?  Has
she had access to anti-freeze or coolant?

I hope this information gives you some ideas on where to look to discover
your Akita's problem.  Let us know what you discover and how she is doing.

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Senior Dog - Our dog has   become much more relaxed and has developed a much slower
way of life. We believe she must have a hip problem as she seems to
loose control of the use of her hips while attempting to stand. She is a
bit over weight and is a little over 5 years of age. What is something
we can do to give her some comfort? She really dislikes going to the vet
after having her surgery for being spayed.       Sincerely and Thanks,
Karen

Senior Dog Response - Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be
your veterinarian.  You don't say what breed of dog you have...some breeds
are more prone to hip related problems than other breeds.  Below are links
about hip related problems in dogs:

http://www.petinfocenter.com/dogs/hip_dysplasia.htm

http://www.vetinfo.com/ddyspla.html

http://www.vetinfo.com/dortho.html

Below are some supplements that are added to many commercial foods to help
support hip problems.  Ask about them at your local pet store:

Glucosamine and Chondroitin
MSM Supplements

Your veterinarian can prescribe pain medication, the most common being
coated aspirin.  If your dog experiences severe reactions to going to the
vet, your vet can prescribe a relaxant prior to going to the vet to make the
visit less stressful.  We recommend you take your dog to a vet to have a
complete check-up.  Hip problems are very painful and only get worse with
age and weight.

Let us know how she is doing. 

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Mange - My Gizmo, 10 month yorkie, has a skin disease. He has been treated for
demadex mange and  ringworm. His treatment have been ongoing  for 5 months
to no avail.  He was a throwaway that my son found in the river hills of
the Pee Dee. His treatment have included skin scraping (10-9-00); Mitaban Dip,
Cestex 25 mg(10-12-00):Clavamox Drops (10-12-00); Mitaban Dip, C.E.T.
PETIT(10-24-00);Woods Lamp Examination,Dip Lyme sulfur(11-7-00); woods
lamp examination, Lixotinic/Fulvicin(11-15-00);Mitaban Dip, Clavamox
Drops(12-18-00); Dip Lyme sulfur(12-20-00);Dip Lyme
Sulfur(1-10-01);Medicated Bath, Mitaban Dip(1-18-01); Fecal (Direct&
Flotation),PCV (Packed cell volume),Hospitalization(1-26-01); Program
brown(02-05-01). His head and legs still glow, under my son blacklight, of
fungus. His chest and stomach still  has a red  rash. He has a persistant
scratching of the rashed areas.He has given me the ringworm fungus, as
diagnosed by my Doctor. I have fell in LOVE with this little fellow and
don't know which way to turn anymore. Should I be questioning my Vet's
diagnosis? Should I be looking for another Vet? Please Help with any
advise you can render.

Mange Response - I can relate to your problem!  I too had a dog diagnosed with Demodex Mange.
You don't say how old your Yorkie is.  Some dogs out grow this problem as
they mature at around 2 years old.   Put simply, Demodex mange is a genetic
defect that is usually with a dog for life.  Demodex is caused by an immune
system failure.  Mange mites are typically found on most dogs...but healthy
dogs with healthy immune systems are not affected by the mites.  When the
immune system becomes weak, the mites take over.  This is also why your dog
may be more susceptible to ringworm than other dogs.   Just in case, cats
are notorious for being ringworm carriers...if you have a cat, have them
checked.  There are some new treatments that can show some improvement and
even a cure.  Dips are generally the cure for normal mange (Scarcopti - the
kind that is not inherited) and can help control outbreaks of Demodex but it
is not a cure.  Has your vet treated your Yorkie with any antibiotics?
Usually with cases of Demodex, a secondary skin infection can develop caused
by the itching and makes it itch worse.  Secondary skin infections can only
be treated with antibiotics.  Below is a link that has more information on
new treatments and Demodex Mange:  Ask your vet about these stronger
treatments:  Ivermectin Shots & Mylbemycin Oxime

http://www.animalclinic.com/demodex.htm

http://www.vetinfo.com/dogdmite.html

http://members.nbci.com/heartlandpug/demodex.htm

Another avenue is supplementing your Yorkie's diet with immune boosting
supplements like:

Immune System - Echinacea, Goldenseal, Grapeseed

Skin supplements:  Biotin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Copper, Sulfur, Zinc, Beta
Carotene, Cod Liver Oil, Rose Hips, Aloe Vera, Fatty Acids, Grapeseed

Our information is provided as a resource and is not meant to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Always check with your vet before
changing or adding treatments.  Your first resource should always be your
veterinarian.

Let me know how your Yorkie is doing.   Debra   Petinfo4u.com

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Digging - We have a 6 month old lab mix.  Everytime we let her
out side she digs up and eats our azaela bushes.  We
would like help on trying to find out something that
would prevent her from doing this. She has already
destroyed 11 bushes and is well on her way to
destroying the rest.  Please help!

Digging Response - From your description, it sounds like you mainly have a digging problem that
has developed into a chewing problem also.  Do you think that she is just
digging or is digging for the purpose of chewing the plants?  Is it possible
she is attracted to the fertilizer you are using on the azaelas?  The
following is information provided on our site to help prevent digging
problems and chewing problems:

"Dogs dig for coolness, boredom, anxiety and smells.  If your dog only digs
during the hot months of summer, try supplying a shaded area or a child
sized pool to cool off in.  Try making sure there are no odors attracting
your dog such as animal odors (gophers, cat feces, etc.) or gas lines.   To
deter your dog from a favorite spot, you can purchase dog and cat repellent
spray at your local pet store.  We have also heard of putting dog poop in
the favorite hole.   Exercise is a great deterrent because a tired dog does
not have the energy to dig holes.  If you would like to try distracting your
dog from bad behavior, shake a soda can filled with rocks to get his
attention and then redirect his attention elsewhere.

If you have a breed that is a natural digger, try building a sandbox or
mudbox for playtime!  Hide various treasures such as bones, chew toys,
balls, and treats.  Be sure to use a specific word for the approved digging
box such as "dig".  This creates an "approved" digging spot for your dog and
keeps him challenged and exercised.    This can also help dogs with
"separation anxiety" problems giving your pet something to do when you are
not available.  Be sure to monitor his digging so he is aware that this is
the acceptable play area and not to dig in some other place in the yard."

"Plant Eater - Anyone who has a plant eater knows how frustrating a habit
this is to break.  We suggest that you try a squirt or two of diluted lemon
juice.   In a water spritzer that has only had water, put in half lemon
juice and half water.  Spray your plants thouroughly.  The lemon juice will
not hurt your plant or your pet and has a sour taste.  If it does not deter
your plant eater, try making a stronger solution with more lemon juice."

Hope this saves your azaelas!

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Yorkie Special Diet - Can anyone tell me what I can feed my yorkie? She is allergic to rice and
corn and she needs a diet consisting of folic acid to prevent the
reoccurance of the stones. She cannot eat the premixed dietary food that
the vet sells due to the contents of rice and corn. I need to find food I can
prepare for her myself.If you know of such foods high in folic acid that
she can eat,please let me know and if not could you tell me where I could find
such food or information?

Yorkie Special Diet Response - Sorry I have not responded sooner, we have been on vacation.  When making your own diet for your dog it is important to find out what is required
nutrition for your dog and be sure to provide the proper nutrition.  Folic
acid (Vitamin B9) is readily available as a vitamin supplement...  Can you
put your dog on an non-corn-rice diet and add Vitamin Supplements to her
diet?  Check with your vet to see what they recommend for vitamin
supplements.

I found the following on a Folic Acid website:

"A group of substances found in the foliage of certain plants have been
given a generic name of Folacin or Folates, of which one of the number is
Folic Acid. When we speak of Folacin, or Folates, we generally are referring
to Folic Acid. This B-complex vitamin is found primarily in dark green leafy
vegetables and heart. Next, it is found in green leafy vegetables and
kidney; then, in lesser amounts in beef, chicken, grains and cereals, and
some canned goods."

Check out these links for information on folic acid:

http://www.naturaldogfood.com/ (go to recipe of the month)

http://www.api4animals.org/doc.asp?ID=79 (info on the commercial dog food)

http://www.recipestoday.com/resources/articles/folicacid.htm (although a
"people" site, great info on foods with folic acid)

Our information is meant as a resource and is not intended to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be
your veterinarian.


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Cairn Terrier - We are thinking about this breed for a new pet.  Would like to know the life span and do they have any problems with this breed.  We are not familar with this one.

 

Cairn Terrier Response - It is so nice to hear about someone researching their new pet before they buy one.  That means that your new dog will have a knowledgable and caring home.  What a great choice with the Cairn Terrier...they are a sturdy, happy-go-lucky, friendly, and energtic breed.  They are also great family dogs because they are good with children and other pets.  As in most pure bred breeds, they do have their share of common health ailments.  This does not mean that all Cairn Terriers develop them but that they have a genetic tendency towards these ailments.  They include; skin and allergy problems and eye problems.  Cairn Terriers can be expected to live as long as 15 years.  Below are links to Cairn Terrier websites that have lots of useful information:
 
 
 
Send us pictures of your new Cairn. 

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Car Sickness - Our puppy loves to get in the car and go for a ride but every time we take him, he
vomits. It appears that he is getting car sick. He starts to drool profusely and
eventually he spews.
What can we do to help prevent this. We wondered if we should give him pepcid?
Thanks,

Car Sickness Response - Travel sickness in puppy's is very common.  Eventually they outgrow it between 1 and 2 years of age.  There are several things you can try to make travel easier for you and your puppy.  Do not give him pepcid.
 
1.  restrict food and water 4 hours before travel
2.  In car, open windows slightly.
3.  Often times the upset stomach is associated with fear or excitement about traveling in the car.  In either case, reducing the fear or excitement by making the trip uneventful is helpful.  Try making short trips around the block (not just to the vet or treat store) and slowly lengthening the trips.  If fear is a factor, be reassuring, bring treats and let dog sit in the car without it moving.  If excitement is a factor, do not make a big deal about leaving or getting in the car.  Set-up several times when you can have your dog sit in the car quietly laying down and relaxing.
 
Below is a link with more information on car sickness in dogs:
 
 
Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian

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Westie Info - I may be receiving a 2 year old spayed female West Highland terrior. What
can you tell me about this breed? My only other dog was a Shi-Poo and I
know that all breeds are different.
My 2 main questions would be, what if any would their medical problems be?
Are they (as a breed) prone to certain illnesses? Would they be a good
breed to bring into a household that already has a cat?

Westie Info Response - Westie's are great dogs.  You should have no problems with your new dog and
cat if they are introduced properly.  Check out our information on new pet
introductions below.  No matter what breed, each dog or cat behave
differently according to their personality.  However, Westie's are
considered a friendly non-aggressive breed.  Westie's have several medical
problems that can be inherited including; skin problems and allergies,
diabetes, and joint problems.  This does not mean that all Westie's have
these problems but have a higher incidence in their breed.  If you know the
prior owner, ask them about any current medical problems.

http://www.westieclubamerica.com/ great site with all kinds of Westie info

New Pet - When introducing a new pet, slowly make the introductions through
a door, kennel, etc.  Let the new pet sleep or play in the other pets
sleeping area (when they are not around) prior to bringing them together.
Another good idea is to let the new pet play or sleep on some of your dirty
clothes to make the new pet smell like you.  This will help the established
pets understand the new pet is part of the family.  Dogs are pack animals
and if you are the leader and make it clear that they are not to harm the
new pet, they will understand and respect your rules.  This means when
introducing them, you hold the new pet and set the rules about when they can
come over to visit and for how long.  Try making them sit and stay far
enough away to see and smell each other and then ask them to come when you
are ready.  Be in control of their play by making them back off when play
becomes rough or excited.  Keep pets separated whenever they are not closely
supervised for about two weeks.  Most pets will work out their pecking
order.  Generally, older pets won't attack younger pets and different sexes
will get along better than same sexes.  It will probably only take a couple
of days to a week to work out who is boss.

Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be
your veterinarian.

Send us a picture of your new friend.

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Aggressive Feeding - I have two terrier puppies, one is more dominant and larger than the other.  
The larger puppy pushes the smaller one away from the water and food bowl.  
How should I feed them? Seperately? I feel bad that the smaller one is always
getting pushed out of the way.

I use seperate dishes, but the bigger one pushes the little one out of which
ever bowl she chooses.

Response Aggressive Feeding - 

This is typicall dominant behavior when you have two dogs living together.  One dog naturally assumes the dominant role.  However, this is not acceptable behavior.  You are the dominant or pack leader of the family.  Both dogs should definetly have their own food and water bowls. 
 
Retrain the dominant dog by making him sit prior to feeding him and making him wait until your command (like "eat") before he can eat.  Do not let him choose which bowl is his.  You decide for him.  Give a sharp "no" each time he goes for the other bowl.  Separating them during the training period is a good idea and as the dominant dog become less aggressive with the food and bowls, reintroduce feeding them together.  You should also be training your other dog with these same commands so that when they are eating together again, they both are waiting for their own bowls on command.  Below is a link with some additional information on dominance behavior.
 
 

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Submissive Urination

We are having a lot of difficulties with our pomeranian.  She urinates heavily anytime anyone touches her or speaks to her unless she comes to you.  If you just walk by and say her name or try to pet her, she urinates all over.  There is nothing wrong with her bladder or kidneys.  We are even unable to try and discipline her because if she does something bad and you even call her name she will scoot along the floor really fast urinating the entire way.  We are unable to brush her because if she even sees me carrying the brush she starts to urinate all over.  I can't even think of what else to do.  I have tried to hold her on my lap, speaking to her very softly and gently stroking her hair and then start to gently brush her hair and she urinates all over me.  She will be a year old in April and I have been working with her since September.  I hate the thought of getting rid of her, but may not have any other alternative.  Do you have any suggestions?

Response Submissive Urination - 

You are not alone in your dog's problem.  This is a common problem with females especially.  If you have had her checked by your vet and there are no problems with her kidneys or bladder, she will more than likely grow out of it by the age 2.  You may see it diminish as she ages.  Submissive urination is commonly related to an overexcited dog or an extremely agitated or abused dog.  From you discription, it sounds as if she is an extremely excitable dog.  Your calmness is a great place to start.  Any discipline can make the behavior worse.  Discipline should simply be removing her from your vacinity.  If she is doing something wrong, (without showing any emotion) immediately remove her to another room and shut the door.  Leave her by herself for about 5 minutes. 
 
This can be a frustrating problem.   This behavior is considered extremely submissive behavior.  It is a way for your dog to show that she is uncomfortable or excited in a situation.  It is more likely seen in a dog that is cowering when someone approaches, however, it is also associated with an over-excited dog.  Did you adopt this dog from a shelter?  This is seen most commonly in abused dogs or dogs adopted from animal shelters. 
Below are several tips you can try to help your dog deal with an exciting or uncomfortable situation:
 
1.  Limit the amount of direct eye contact upon entering the house and for the first five minutes.  Do not make arriving or leaving the house a big event. This will help your dog feel less threatened or overly emotional. 
 
2.  Do not show any excited or overt gestures upon entering the house.  Keep arrivals calming.  Wait to greet and pet your dog until you have been home for more than five minutes.  By waiting for the hello, you will reduce the level of excitement and give no reason to urinate. 
 
3.  Upon entering the home and before petting your dog try distracting her attention.  Try going straight to the food bowl and putting some treats into the bowl to distract her for a couple of minutes after you arrive home.  You could use a favorite chew treat also. 
4.  If you know someone is coming over to the house, tell them not to pay attention to your dog until they moved from the front door and sat down for 5 or more minutes.
 
Check out this link for other ideas:
 
 
 
 
This information is meant as a resource and not as a replacement for veterinary advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.   

 

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Cat Dog Friends? - We have a 2 year old border terrier and just got a 4
year old cat. They seem to tolerate each other well
(no fighting, just some hissing once in awhile, but do
they have a chance of actually becoming friends? We've
been told by many people older cats introduced to new
dogs will ignore them. This cat has lived with 2 older
dogs. Is there anything we can do to encourage
friendship? Thanks!    PJ

Response Cat Dog Friends? - Your off to a great start if there is minimal hissing and reaction.
However, as with people, all pets have different personalities.  It is hard
to tell how they are going to react together long-term.  Their friendship
may also depend on how they interacted with other pets from previous
relationships.  If they had bad experiences, this can affect how they react
to each other now.  Here are a couple of suggestions to try and make them
life-long friends:

Status in the household is important.  All pets have a rank in the family.
If you can keep them on equal terms as far as the pecking order goes this
might help ( a lot like children!).  Feed them at the same times and let
them interact and play with the family together.   Sleeping arrangements may
help also.  If one is allowed to sleep on the bed, do not exclude the other
and vice versa.

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Dog Eating Own Poop - 

We have a eight month old Shu Zu (spelling is wrong) that eats its own feces. We have tried things such as FORBID with no luck.
Any thoughts are suggestions? We read where there may be a vitamin deficiency such as B or K. Is that true?

Response Dog Eating Own Poop - 

To us humans it seems like the grossest of habits, however, to a dog their feces and other pets feces smells like a great afternoon snack.  Keeping this in mind, it is said that feeding a dog garlic can give the poop smell bad and give a foul taste.  You said that you have tried the commercial products like Forbid with no success...  There is another product on the market that is called Bitter Apple (that is not used for this but I thought it might help) which can be purchased in local pet stores.  It makes things taste bitter and most pets do not like it.  Try spraying his feces with the bitter apple to repel him.  Bitter apple is used to repel dogs and cats from furniture, gardens, and other chewing habits. 
 
Another aspect to feces eating a learned behavior.  To correct this learned behavior; keep access to feces to a minimum (pick it up asap), use a key word "yuck" when you don't want him to touch something and use it when he is caught eating feces, keep him distracted from eating the feces with toys and treats.  He may view his feces as a pleasant treat during the day.  Provide alternative pleasant treats. 
 
Because commercial dog foods are cooked at high temperatures, it is said that they lose a lot of their nutritional value and that you should supplement the diet with vitamins.   A normal daily dog vitamin should be sufficient to replace any lost nutrition.  Some people feel it is a dietary issue that can be cured by adding veggies to the diet.  You can try adding veggies like ground carrots.    
 
This is also a common problem in puppies and is usually outgrown by the age of 1 to 2.  Below are some links with some additional information:
 
 
  
 

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Female Heat Cycle and Care

I have an 8 month old golden retriever.  She just went into her first heat.  How can I protect my carpeting, etc. from this?  Also, about how long will the heat last?

Female Heat Cycle and Care - Bleeding associated with a dog's heat cycle usually comes as a surprise to most dog owners.  The larger the breed the more they bleed.  The bleeding usually last from a couple of days to 10 days.  As in people, every dog is different.  There are sanitary pads and pants that you can buy that are specially made for dogs.  The most common brand is Four Paws.  Below is a picture of the product which you can find at any local pet store:

If you are not planning on breeding your dog, we recommend spaying as soon as possible.  Spaying your dog will greatly reduce her chances of getting certain types of cancers such as; mammory tumors, ovarian tumors, etc. 
 

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Female Care After Parturition - Would it be possible for you to tell me what special care i would have to
take of a dam or queen 7-8 weeks after parturition?
Your help would be very much appreciated.   Thank you

Female Care Response - Is your female experiencing any specific problems?  She should be well
recovered from the birthing process by 7-8 weeks.  If you are noticing any
changes in her behavior, you should immediately have her looked at by your
veterinarian.  Symptoms of problems include;  vomiting, loss of appetite,
lethargy, fever, and any discharge.

If she is not having any problems, she should be on a high quality puppy
formula that is high in fat to give her extra energy and more milk for the
puppies.  There are also formulas specifically made for nursing mothers.
She should have access to ample water which is essential in milk production.
During the nursing process the mother requires double the amout for food she
is fed normally.  The puppies' nursing is a high demand on her body and she
can become easily run down.

Since the puppies are around 8 weeks of age, they are ready or should be
done with the weaning process.  If the puppies are being weaned onto puppy
food, they should be fed seperately from the mother.  She will allow them to
eat before she does and she may not be getting enough to eat.  She may also
be having trouble with mastitis, caused by milk production that she does not
need.  This can be alleviated by reducing the amount of her food for a
couple of days (on the day the puppies are weaned you may want to not feed
her at all, until the next day).  She should be slowly weaned back onto her
normal maintenance diet over a week period.  Now that the puppies are older,
give her breaks away from the puppies and take her for a walk.

Send us some pictures of the puppies! 

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Anti-freeze Poisoning - my Pomeranian drank anti-freeze a couple of months ago. we got her to the vet and she seems fine now. i worry that she has suffered long term damage. does she have pain? will she live a long life? are her internal organs damaged? i worry about pebbles, it was all my fault i should have been watching her closer. please let me know. thanks

Anti-Freeze Response - 

I am so glad to hear that your Pom made it!  So often this type of poisoning is fatal.  It sounds as though you caught it in time and she may have no ill effects from the poisoning.  She should be in no pain from a poisoning that happened a couple of months ago.  Did your veterinarian run any test on her kidneys at the time?  Kidney failure is a common complication in anti-freeze poisoning.  If she is showing no ill effects from this, I would not worry but would keep an eye on her as she ages to see if she shows any signs of kidney problems.  If you are concerned, your veterinarian can run some simple blood tests to see how her kidneys are functioning.  The following are common signs of kidney trouble:
 
The kidneys filter the blood by throwing away the waste in the urine and returning all the vital fluids and nutrients to the blood stream.  Symptoms of kidney failure can include:  increased thirst, increased urination, loss of appetite and vomiting.  
 
Pebbles has a loving and caring home and that is important to long life and happiness.   Debra  Petinfo4u.com

 

Yorkie Breeding - I have a yorkshire terrior,  At what age would she go into heat for the first time and should we breed her during her first time?             

Yorkie Breeding  Response - 

She should have her first heat between 5 and 6 months.  All dogs vary and some have them as late as one year old.  There are many different ideas about breeding.  A responsible breeder will breed at around 2 years of age.  Young mothers are sometimes known to refuse feeding and caring for the pups and c-sections can be more likely (common in the smaller breeds).  Waiting lets the female's body develop completely and by two, you will know if she develops any long-term health problems or genetic defects that can be passed on to her children.  Below are more links with breeding information:
 
 
 
There are lots of great books also available at your local pet store and on-line:
 
 
Good luck and let us know what you decide,  Debra   Petinfo4u.com

 

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November 25, 2000 - Pooping Problem - I have a yorkshire terrior who is 8 months old.  He is trained outside as far as urination is concerned.  The problem is his poops.  He can't seem to
control when or where he does it.  He has done it in his crate, in his bed, on the carpet, on my bed and even while he was going up the stairs.  I don't understand how he can control his
bladder but not his feces.  He knows he has been bad when I discover he has made a mess.  I take him out
first thing in the morning, after meals, and every couple of hours.  When he
goes it's in a split second, you don't have time to react and put him out.  
An example:  He just woke up from a nap, he got out of his bed and stretched
then pooped right where he was. Other times he has just been outside and
comes in and within ten minutes he poops.   He does go outside but lately it
seems to be more inside than out.  Is he just a nervous breed and he has
difficulty controlling himself?  Any comments would be helpful.  Thank you.

November 25, 2000 Pooping Problem Response - 

From your description it does sound as if your Yorkie doesn't realize he is eliminating (it is very unusual for a dog to soil their bed).   With this in mind, there are several things that could be happening.  All of which should be evaluated and treated by your veterinarian as soon as possible.  If he is actually experiencing a loss of control it could be related to some type of nerve damage or nerve problem, rectal polyps or even a problem with his spine.  Yorkie's are susceptible to spinal and hip problems which can be related to fecal incontinence.  Have you noticed any changes in his gate or tenderness in the back?   You don't say if his stool is hard or soft....if it is soft, he should be checked for worms or other intestinal problem. 
 
Below is a link with some information on fecal incontinence:
 
 
Evaluate whether your Yorkie is actually having trouble knowing he is eliminating or whether he is just being lazy.  Some dogs become lazy (smaller breeds in particular) and need retraining.    Below is a link on house training just in case:
 
 
Any change in your Yorkie's behavior could be a sign of a serious illness.  Please take your Yorkie to your vet as soon as possible for a complete check-up.  Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace veterinary care, advice or medical treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.
 
Let us know if you discover the problem.   Debra  Petinfo4u.com

 

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Non-Allergenic Breed? - Are Yorkshire Terriers a non-allergenic breed?  Erin

Non-Allergenic Breed Response - 

There are breeds of dogs that are less allergenic to people than other breeds.  These breeds are less allergenic because they do not shed as much.  Yorkies are considered to be in this group of light shedders.  Other breeds include:  Bichon Friese, Scottish Terrier, West Highland Terriers, Schnauzers, Poodles and Greyhounds.  There is no such thing as a "non-allergenic" dog.  It is the dander of the skin that most people are allergic to.  This can never be totally eliminated.   Debra  Petinfo4u.com
 

Allergy-Free Breed - What is a good dog to get for a child who has
severe asthma and alergies?  He wants a dog so badly.   Of course the
first thing to do is ask his pediatrican and alergist.   But, what is a good
family dog to give a nice loving home to and make this little boy very
happy?

Allergy Response - I assume from your signature that you are not the child's parent.  It is
very important that if the dog is to be a gift that you check with the
parents and it is wanted.  Pets as gifts is the number one reason why the
animal shelters are overrun with unwanted pets.

What a great friend for caring so much to find the necessary information to
make an informed decision on which breed of dog is best for allergies!
However, I am sure you have read that there is no true allergy free breed.
There are some breeds that shed less than others making them more popular
with people with allergies.  However, the number one cause of pet allergies
is actually to the skin dander and not the hair.  All animals, as well as
humans, have skin dander which can never be eliminated.   Less allergenic
breeds include most wire haired breeds such as terriers, bichons, yorkshire
terriers, poodles, west highland terrier, greyhound, and shih tzu.

My favorite less allergenic breed is a Bichon Frise.  They are great family
dogs and good with children.  You don't say how old the child is...but
Bichons are good with children over the age of 5.

I have included links with information on other less allergenic breeds as
well a links to Bichon information (one on our site):

http://dogs.about.com/library/weekly/aa121200a.htm

http://www.cuhumane.org/topics/allergy.html

 http://www.bichon.org/

http://www.petinfo4u.com/bichon.htm

http://www.westieclubamerica.com/ (another good breed)


Our information is provided as a resource and is not intended to replace
medical care, advice or treatment. 

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October 25, 2000 - Inappropriate Elimination

i have a 1 year old golden retreiver,rottweiler mix . when poeple come over he gets excited and pees is there any thing i can do?

October 25, 2000 - Response - 

This can be a frustrating problem.  It is a common problem in puppies and usually diminishes with age (you should see improvement before 2 years old).  This behavior is considered extremely submissive behavior.  It is a way for your dog to show that he is uncomfortable or excited in a situation.  It is more likely seen in a dog that is cowering when someone approaches, however, it is also associated with an over-excited dog.  Did you adopt this dog from a shelter?  This is seen most commonly in abused dogs or dogs adopted from animal shelters. 
 
Below are several tips you can try to help your dog deal with an exciting or uncomfortable situation:
 
1.  Limit the amount of direct eye contact upon entering the house.  This will help your dog feel less threatened or overly emotional. 
 
2.  Do not show any excited or overt gestures upon entering the house.  Keep arrivals calming.  Wait to greet and pet your dog until you have been home for more than five minutes.  By waiting for the hello, you will reduce the level of excitement and give no reason to urinate. 
 
3.  Upon entering the home and before petting your dog try distracting his attention.  Try going straight to the food bowl and putting some treats into the bowl to distract him for a couple of minutes after you arrive home.  You could use a favorite chew treat also. 
 
4.  If you know someone is coming over to the house, tell them not to pay attention to your dog until they moved from the front door and sat down for 5 or more minutes.
 
Check out this link for other ideas:
 
 
 
This information is meant as a resource and not as a replacement for veterinary advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be your veterinarian.  
 
Hope this helps,
Debra

 

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October 25, 2000 - Pig Ear Stuck - I have a very small (2 lbs. 5 ounce) chihuahua who swallowed a  piece of pigs ear.  She has had a difficult time throwing it up.  She is
breathing well, but refuses food.  This happened last night.  Should I
try to get her to eat or let her go at her own pace?  I have eukaneuba
food in the dry state also I have a can of soft eukaneuba.  What would
be your advice?

October 25, 2000 - Pig Ear Response - From your description is sounds as though the piece of pig's ear did not cause a blockage of her lungs, which is good.  However, there is no way of
knowing if the blockage is in her throat or her stomach.  Either way this
can be a serious problem and should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
As with most dried dog products such as rawhide, pig's ears, etc.., once
they are introduced to the moist environment of the stomach, they can swell
to a larger size compounding the problem.  Force feeding her may make the
problem worse.  Since she is not eating and I am assuming not drinking also,
she is in need of veterinary care.


You say this happened last night....most dogs that choke or swallow large
objects and do not have a serious blockage are able to pass them on their
own either by throwing up or passing the object in a bowel movement within a
day (they generally are still able and willing to eat).  If she continues to
show signs of throwing up or gagging and refuses to eat and drink for more
than a day, please take her to the vet.

This information is meant as a resource and is not meant to replace
veterinary care, advice or treatment.  Your first resource should always be
your veterinarian.


Let us know how she is doing,
Debra


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September 29, 2000 - Dachshund Stud  - I have a 8 month old male stud AKC and I am interested in breeding him out.  Can you give me any info on how to do it properly and how to choose a
mate?  Any info would be appreciated. Thanks

September 29, 2000 - Breeding Response - You've come to the right place.  Our family breeds miniature Dachshunds.  You don't say whether you have a minature or a standard.  There are several
things to consider when choosing a mate:  If you have a minature and want to
keep the babies in the miniature range, be sure to choose a small female
(about 8 lbs.).  Decide what color you prefer, red or black and tan.  We have bred a red and a black and tan for years and have a beautiful mix of puppies.  If you like the color of your male, then
choose a mate in that color.  Choose the female carefully for temperament,
size, color, and confirmation.  Decide what strengths and weaknesses your
male has and try to find a female that compliments those traits.  You may be
asked by a potential mate if your male is a "proven" stud.  This simply
means has he sired puppies successfully?   Insist on knowing the mates
history paying careful attention to any hereditary diseases.  Dachshunds are
particularly susceptible to Degenerative Disc Disease (back problems), Heart
Disease and Diabetes.

Breeding usually takes place in the males environment.  Males can become
distracted from their duties when not in their own environment.  She may
need to be at your house for several days to ensure breeding.  The two are
usually introduced while being restrained on their leashes.  Sometimes the
female will show aggression if she is not ready to accept the male.  We
recommend muzzles when breeding to avoid any unneccessary injuries.  If the
male is inexperienced you may need to assist.  Once the male and female have
"locked" they should be left alone until done.   The "locked" position can
last up to 30 minutes.

For your information the gestational period of a Dachshund is around 63
days.  Most litters range in size from 2 - 5 puppies.

The links below should have more helpful information:

http://showdogsupersite.com/kenlclub/k9journal/k9j002.html

http://showdogsupersite.com/kenlclub/breedvet/vpbsd1.html

http://www.akc.org/breeds/breederinfo/breeder.cfm

This information is provided as a resource and is not meant to be
all-inclusive.  Your veterinarian should be your first resource for
information on breeding.  There are also a lot of great books available on
breeding at your local pet store and book store.  Try The Illustrated
Veterinary Guide.

Send us pictures of the puppies!  Debra  Petinfo4u.com

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August 10, 2000 - Older Dog Biting - Don't know if you can help but here is my dillema. I have 2 yorkshire terriors. Both are males.  one is 13 years old and 14 pounds. The other is 3 years old and 4 pounds.  We have had the old dog for 10 years. The younger dog we have had for 2 years.  They got along well for about the first 6 months. then every so often the older dog started to attack the younger
dog.  in February of 1999 we had the older dog neutered on the advise of our
vet. He said this might curb the aggression. It did not. since then the attacks
have become more frequent. In the past month they occur as often as the older dog can
get the chance.  If we move to quick , if commotion occurs, if the small dog gets
in his way, etc.  Our vet. does not seem to have an answer.
Also the old dog is developing cataracts.  I thought perhaps its his eye
sight that makes him this way.  But again I think Not.  My husband seems to think
that the little dog may be giving off an odour and if we neutered him that
might help.  But I don't want to do that unless I know it will work.(as I've said above
it did not work on the one dog.)  I do not want to have to get rid of one of them, but we are at our wits
end.  If you have any answer I will be forever greatful.   thanks for input.   Victoria

August 10, 2000 - Older Dog Biting Response - I think you hit the nail on the head with the comment about the cataracts and aging.  A common problem with aging dogs is biting.  There are several
reasons this could be happening such as; losing eyesight, loss of hearing,
and arthritis.  You say that you have had a thorough check-up by your
vet...is it possible that your dog is in any pain?  Common biting in older
dogs is related to hidden pain associated with arthritis.  You also state
"quick movement" sets him off and "if small dog gets in his way".  These
symptoms can be related to a loss of hearing and eyesight.  He may be
surprised suddenly and frightened.  The best way to combat eyesight and
hearing related biting is to be sure when introducing new items (such as
furniture) to the household, be sure that he is oriented to the new item.
One of the links below has a great suggestion on spraying items with a
unique smell to let them know where they are.  For hearing problems, when
you are near the dog, be sure to let him know you are there before you touch
him.  This may be difficult with the little dog.  Try using a special dog
perfume on your little dog to give him a special odor when approaching the
older dog.

Older dogs also become more aggressive and territorial as they get older.
To combat territories in the household, you should be the pack leader or
dominant leader.  Do not allow heirarchal sitting such as on the couch.
Their bed should be "their" territory.  Any other dominant behavior should
be curbed such as growling during feeding, getting out the door first, etc..
One of the links below has a section on spacial aggression or territories.

I know you probably don't want to hear this, but unless you are planning on
breeding the little dog, you should probably have him neutered.  This may
help the situation.  Testosterone is a funny thing.  It may be setting off
the older dog too.  Neutering is in no way harmful and even helps eliminate
some types of cancer.

The links below have some ideas on how to treat aggression:

http://www.inch.com/~dogs/taming.html

http://www.metrokc.gov/lars/animal/Educate/cassidy/dog/dog4.htm

http://www.metrokc.gov/lars/animal/Educate/cassidy/dog/dog37.htm

http://www.narcy.com/doggiedoor/doghouse/aggress4.htm#Space (page down to
"spacial aggression")

Your first resource for any medical and behavioral problems should be your
veterinarian.  This information is provided as a resource and is not
intended to replace veterinary advice or treatment.

Hope this helps!  I know how frustrating it can be to have to family members
at each others throats.  Let us know what you find out,
Debra


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August 1, 2000 - Inbreeding - my papillon has just given birth to a puppy and I have decided to keep
him.  My question is if the puppy mates with its mother, will the puppies turn
out to be deformed??

August 1, 2000 - Inbreeding Response - There are three types of  breeding;  linebreeding, inbreeding and
outbreeding.  Inbreeding has; father to daughter, mother to son, brother to
sister and half brother to half sister.   There are many genetic issues with
inbreeding which is why we do not recommend inbreeding unless you are a
trained genetisis.  It is not necessarily considered dangerous to inbreed
these relationships.  However, deformities are a concern.    Bulldogs are a
perfect example because of their spinal deformities, elongated palates, etc.
Many genetic problems may not show up until the third or fourth generation.
There are lots of questions that come into play when deciding to breed your
dogs.  The most important question to ask yourself is... Can I improve this
breed by breeding the mother and son together?  By breeding related dogs,
keep in mind that you are enhancing any and bad qualities.   Many medical
problems associated with a particular breed are compounded with inbreeding.
Papillons have inherited problems such as Patellar Luxation (knee problems),
bite and palate defects and Retinal Atrophy (eye problems, which has testing
available).  Below are articles that I found on the web which you may find
helpful in making your decision:

http://www.k9web.com/dog-faqs/medical/whelping.html

http://home.interlynx.net/~tech1/MiPao/confus.htm

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/dogs-faq/breeding/

This information is meant as a resource and not as a replacement for
veterinary advice or treatment.  Your veterinarian should be your first
resource.

Thank you for your great question,  Debra Petinfo4u.com


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July 25, 2000 - Plant Eating - Hi, I've noticed recently that my cat and dog have both taken to eating the
leaves of certain plants in our back garden.  I very much doubt they are
doing this out of hunger, and I suspect that maybe they may be using the
leaves to aid the digestion process or maybe they may have a deficiency in
a certain vitamin?  Do you have any ideas??  I'd love to hear them.  Thank
you very much for your time. Kind regards, Sean

July 25, 2000 - Plant Eating   Response- As background on plant eating, it is very normal for cats and dogs to eat grass and even develop a taste for some plants.  In the wild as they eat
their kill, dogs and cats will accidentally eat grass and may even seek it
out as part of their diet.  As for a reason for this behavior, there are two
reasons we think dogs and cats like to eat grass or plants.

1.  It may be an aide in digestion and may help calm an upset stomach.
2.  Some even consider grass and plants to be an essential part of an
animals diet because in the wild they are known to eat grass and plants.

Generally, it is not a concern if your dog or cat are the occasional grass
or plant eater.  If you are feeding a high quality pet food, then vitamins
should not be a concern.  You may however want to supplement their diet with
a vitamin at least once per week.

You do want to be careful because there are many common household plants
that are poisonous to pets (such as:jasmine, azaleas, some forms of ivy, and
many more).  Below is a link to a site that has a listing of many plants.
This may not be a complete list, check with your vet for further help on
poisonous plants.

http://health.ucsd.edu/poison/plants.htm

Tip:  Make sure that they do not have access to the grass for several days
after the lawn has been fertilized as this can induce vomiting and poisoning
too.  You should take your pet to the vet if the grass or plant eating
involves vomiting, vomiting continues for more than once or twice and if you
notice any blood.

If there are any changes in behavior or diet with your pets this can be a
sign of illness, your veterinarian should always be your first resource for
medical care and advice.  This information is meant as a resource.

Thank you for your great question and participation in our website
Debra   Petinfo4u.com


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July 13, 2000 - Shedding - I have a golden labrador retreiver / Shepherd cross.  He is about 2
years old.  He is not neutered.  Even though it is July, he is still
shedding continually and excessively.  He has a good appetite, lots of
energy, no other problems except  for a slight discharge from his eyes.
What could be wrong here?   Phyllis

July 13, 2000 - Shedding Response - Excessive shedding associated with a medical problem will usually take on the appearance of bald spots and red or irritated skin.  If you notice a
dramatic thinning, red and irritated skin or excessive itching, then there
could be an underlying medical problem such as allergies or a thyroid
problem.  If this is the case, please take your dog to your vet for a
complete check-up.  Dogs shed all year long but during the spring and winter
months you will notice a dramatic increase in the amount of hair when they
shed their winter and summer coats.  Even though it is July, if there has
been a dramatic temperature change you may notice an increase in the amount
of hair loss, however, this should not be to the point of bald spots or
notice any increased itching.

I am more concerned with the "slight eye discharge" that you mention.  This
time of year can bring Conjunctivitis.  This is a condition caused by dry
irritated eyes and is basically an eye infection.  In severe cases, this can
be a sign of a respiratory infection.  It is not normal for your dog to have
"goopy" or runny mucus in the eye.  Since you are showing some concern and
have noticed a change in the "norm" for your dog, it is probably a good idea
to have a thorough check-up by your veterinarian.

This information is meant as a resource and not as a treatment or diagnosis.
Always consult your veterinarian if you have any concerns or problems with
your pet.

Thanks for your participating in our website.  Let us know how your dog is
doing, we care and love to hear follow-ups.  Debra   Petinfo4u.com


 

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June 30, 2000 - Dachshund Breeding - We have a 8lb female dachshund. She is 18mths old and has had 2 heat cycles.  My husband is wanting to breed her, but I'm not sure if I want to. The
breeder we have talked to, has a 10 to 11lb male he is wanting us to use. I
think this male is to large for our dog, and I don't want to do anything that
would endanger her. Should we continue to search for a male her size or
smaller? I have been told she might require a c-section if we use a dog
larger than her. Please let me know if this is a possibility.
                                                     Thanks, Annette

June 30, 2000 Dachshund Breeding Response - You've come to the right place.  Our family breeds miniature Dachshunds.  We definitely agree with you and feel that it is important to keep the male
under 8 lbs to decrease the risk of c-section.  There are several things to
consider when choosing a mate:  If you want to keep the babies in the
miniature range, choose a smaller male.  Decide what color you prefer, red
or black and tan.  We have bred a red and a black and tan for years and have
a beautiful mix of puppies.  If you like the color of your female, then
choose a mate in that color.  Choose the male carefully for temperament,
size, color, and confirmation.  Also ask for a proven male (a male that has
sired puppies and is not sterile).

For your information the gestational period of a Dachshund is around 63
days.  Most litters range in size from 2 - 5 puppies.  In our breeding
experience, we have never had a female that required a c-section.  However,
there is always that possibility.

Hope this helps.  Send us a picture of the puppies!  Debra, Petinfo4u.com


 

 

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June 21, 2000 - Puppy Training - I have a 14 week old puppy and am interested in finding out more about training methods.   Can you recommend any training books to read?  Connie

June 21, 2000 - Puppy Training Response -We have done a lot of research on dog training techniques and books.  The following are some links that you may want to look at with some good tips and information.

http://www.uwsp.edu/acad/psych/dog/dog.htm

http://www.inch.com/~dogs/

I also checked out what Amazon has to offer and found a book I have read and liked that contains quick tips and is a basic training guide that is short, easy to read and inexpensive.  DK 101 Essential Tips Training Your Dog  The links below are all books on training available on Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0789414600/qid%3D961653486/104-6635056-2106310

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877193533/qid=961653144/sr=1-41/104-6635056-2106310

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0793818826/ref=sim_books/104-6635056-2106310

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0671251937/ref=sim_books/104-6635056-2106310

Don't miss some of our basic tips under Pet Tip of the Week and Advanced Tips - Dogs.  Happy Training!   Debra, Petinfo4u.com

 

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May 9, 2000 - Ticks - We are looking for a links, that will provide us with
specific information, and / or photgraphs about
different varieties of ticks.  We have a mediums sized
dog with a thick coat of fur, who seems to have many
more ticks than our other pets.  We would like to control this
and have tried many products, to no avail.  Thank you, Tresa

May 9, 2000 Tick Response - Ticks!  They are a problem.  Some dogs seem to be more susceptible to 
them than others.  Sounds like you have one of those dogs.  There are 
two types of ticks that affect dogs called the American Dog Tick and the
Brown Tick.  Your dog can also pick up deer ticks which are the carriers
of lyme disease.  It sounds like you have tried just about everything to 
solve this problem.   I will mention a few other ideas just in case.  
Have you tried a little garlic in your dogs' food?  Have you done the
flea and tick treatments in a cyclical pattern (usually every 3 to 4 
weeks)  to be sure to kill the eggs and the hatching young?  Have you 
tried the new products on the market such as Advantage, Program and Frontline?
Don't forget to treat the animals' yard, bedding, and house.  Treatment 
includes, powders, shampoos, collars, foggers, and yard sprays on a 
regular schedule (check out  Avanced Dogs for our recommended schedule paw3.gif (983 bytes)).
If you are looking for links, below are a couple that I have found.  
Just double click on the link (AOL may not allow this so type in the
address exactly as shown).
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/scripts/htmlgen.exe?DOCUMENT_IG088  To return hit your back browser button
http://www.ent.iastate.edu/ipm/iiin/tamerican.html  To return hit your back browser button
http://www.lyme.org/ticks/facts.html  To return hit your back browser button
I hope that this information has been helpful.  Let me know how it goes, =
we are always interested if our suggestions help.  Good Luck!  Debra
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